Wil Wheaton And The SAG-AFTRA Strike Analysis

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Wil Wheaton and the SAG-AFTRA Strike The blog post “This is why I support a SAG-AFTRA strike authorization for video games — and it isn’t about money” by actor Wil Wheaton is written to snatch the attention of video game consumers who might have not be aware of another viewpoint on a controversial topic. Wheaton used a self-contradiction in order to garner the attention of the opposite side or people on the fence of a vehemently disputed subject. The issue in dispute revolves around whether the union video game voice actors belong to, SAG-AFTRA (Screen Actors Guild‐American Federation of Television and Radio Artists), will go on strike if a new agreement can’t be negotiated on fair payment for their work with video game publishers. This is …show more content…

With people choosing sides before even hearing both sides of the discussion, it may have been necessary to include this in the title in order to reach the audience across the aisle. He places this self-contradiction at the end of his post so he can try to sway the audience before they reach that point in the writing. However, by contradicting himself he’s also confirming that he is somewhat bias on the situation if the readers hadn’t picked up on that yet. By confirming it himself he’s taking away ammunition that could be used against his argument. On the other hand, some readers may see that as discrediting everything else he presented before that …show more content…

Video game consumers are quite the outspoken group of people, mixing them in with political debates around unions in general and it results in a very controversial topic. The audience is split and there isn’t really a clear good or bad side, but rather just two differing opinions on a topic whose originators are fairly silent on the issue. The video game publishers have never addressed the public on the topic and only a few members of the union have expanded beyond saying they support their union. A few developers have made a stance against some of the demands of SAG-AFTRA though. Alex Hutchinson, who is a creative director at Ubisoft Montreal, made his stance clear on the topic by tweeting the following message, “If @WilWheaton gets royalties on a game before myself or any of the others who spent years (not weeks) working on it, the system is broken.” This sentence sums up most of the arguments against the union demands. Why should voice actors get paid more when hundreds of developers who spend years making a single game won’t get the same benefits as people who only spend a week working on a project? Even though some people disagree with Wheaton’s position, he did provide a viewpoint that wasn’t being expressed to the public prior to his engagement in the

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