William Franklin's The Autobiography Of Benjamin Franklin

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This particular autobiography begins with an open note from Benjamin Franklin, to his son, William Franklin. William Franklin was the Royal Governor of New Jersey of the time being. The letter states that Benjamin was writing this very autobiography in the summer of 1771, on vacation. He had believed he should take the time on his well deserved vacation, to evaluate his own life, to give insight to his offspring. He then mentions all, if not most of his family ancestry, leaving kind words to brothers, sisters, uncles, aunts, and finally, an ode to his beloved parents. Although Benjamin Franklin had heavily noted his dislikes and admirations of his own father, ranging from him mentioning Josiah Franklin’s remarkable debate skills or his encouragement…show more content…
He would continue to work in the printing/press business in Philadelphia for only a couple short months. Along this adventure, Benjamin Franklin had established ties with incredibly powerful politicians such as The Royal Governor; as well as others. Eventually, Benjamin Franklin would be persuaded to spend some time over in the mother country, England. Benjamin Franklin also noted him befriending a Mr. Denham, a Quaker, whom would remain friend with him during his stay in England. He would be spending a total of a year and a half over in England, arriving in London on December 24th, 1724. Only to work for yet, another news paper press. Benjamin Franklin seemed to have befriended a man by the name of James Ralph in his new work environment, a co worker of his. Soon enough Benjamin Franklin would be promoted to composing articles, instead of being a press boy. Later on, their friendship will perish after lengthy discussions on debate strategy and the practice of vegetarianism. Benjamin Franklin would then mention in the book that his error in his own methods or ways of handling certain situations really fades into his concept of self improvement, he then mentions he is confronting his mistakes to ensure other do not make the same as him. Followed by him stating that he realizes he had approached a situation perfectly, hence him realizing his mistakes. After his eighteen months in London, Mr. Denham had been convinceing Benjamin Franklin that his duties would best be served back in his home of Philadelphia rather than to be in the heart of
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