American Anti Monopolist Analysis

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Many of Bryan’s anti monopolist policies were rooted in the values instilled within him during his childhood. William Jennings Bryan was born in the small town of Salem, Illinois on March 19, 1860, to Silas Bryan and Mariah Elizabeth Jennings Bryan. Just 6 years later, Bryan and his family moved to a farm area just north of Salem. As a result, Bryan grew up with the influences of a farming community surrounding him. As those around him were farmers as well, he was made aware of the many issues that farmers faced. Furthermore, as his father, Silas Bryan was a well respected judge and politician, Bryan was further exposed to the many difficulties faced by the working class. Having served two consecutive terms as a Democratic senator for the…show more content…
The Republican party stood firm by its position to abolish the monetization of silver and completely convert to the gold standard. In a statement released by the Republican party during their 1896 Republican National Convention, “We are unalterably opposed to every measure calculated to debase our currency or impair the credit of our currency. We are therefore opposed to the free coinage of silver.” The democrats on the other hand were divided on the issue. Some of the democrats sided with the republicans, believing in the dismantling of bimetallism and the conversion to the gold standard. However, a good majority of the democrats believed that silver in the economy should not be halted. These supporters wanted to maintain the production of both silver and gold… As the selected candidate for the Democratic party, Bryan embraced the free silver policies in the hopes of aiding the working class citizens that supported…show more content…
Bryan believed in the free coinage of silver, aiming to bring the scattered free-silver forces of Republicans and Democrats together. Bryan wanted to unite all of those who believed for this cause… In his famous “Cross of Gold” speech delivered at the Democratic National Convention in 1896, Bryan ...“Have behind us the producing masses of the nation and the world, supported by the commercial interests, the laboring interests, and the toilers everywhere” Nevertheless, in supporting those in favor of bimetallism, Bryan clashed with those who supported the gold standard. The majority of those in favor of the gold standard, democrats and republicans alike, were often affiliated with big corporations and businesses. Bryan himself was strongly opposed to the men involved with these conglomerates that dominated the American economy. He viewed the “money men of the East” as agents of evil. ...Bryan directly addressed these supporters of the gold standard, warning that “You[gold standard supporters] shall not press down upon the brow of labor this crown of thorns, you shall not crucify mankind upon a cross of gold.” While his disapproval of the upper class citizens ultimately derailed his campaign, it also helped him achieve a dual nomination from both the Democratic and Populist
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