William Schutz's Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation: Behavior

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Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation-Behaviour (FIRO-B) Introduction Interpersonal relationships exists primarily between two or more individuals. It is moreover, a social connection which is based on love, solidarity and regular business interactions or in some other social settings. People involved share their thoughts, feelings, influence each other and engage in activities as well. Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation (FIRO-B) is explains interpersonal relations. William Schutz (1958) explained that when people get together in a group, there are three main interpersonal needs they are looking to obtain – affection/openness, control and inclusion. Schutz developed the FIRO-B theory to aid in the understanding and predicting of how high-performance military teams would work together. He began with the premise that "people need people” and used the term interpersonal to indicate any interaction, real or imagined, occurring between people. He then developed a measuring instrument that contains six scales of nine-item questions. This technique was created to measure or control how group members feel when it comes to inclusion, control, and affection/openness or to be able to get feedback from people in a group. Unlike many instruments used to examine human interaction behaviours, and needs, the FIRO-B is and was extremely valid internally and externally using inferential statistics. The scale assesses how group members feel when it comes to: Inclusion

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