Witchcraft In The 13th Century

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“Thou shalt not suffer a witch to live.” Witchcraft was nothing like a new phenomenon, it was seen as a practical practice in part of traditional villages and cultures for many centuries. Throughout time, witchcraft came to be viewed as both dangerous and sinister, and many churches began to connect the transformation of witchcraft as activities of the Devil. Many people were accused of witchcraft practices after the establishment of the Inquisition during the thirteenth century. Multiple witchcraft trials were held throughout England, Switzerland, Scotland and Germany, and those who were suspected of witchcraft were turned over to secular authorities in order to be burned at the stake or to be hanged.
To begin with, the spread of witchcraft was increased dramatically as well as the
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Throughout Europe, more than hundreds of thousands of people were prosecuted due charges of witchcraft. Witchcraft conspiracies were escalated from large cities to small towns and rural areas. Witchcraft was seen as an existential cycle in the human race since simple sorcery was set out through the offering of the helpful spirits and throughout the use of charms, it was mostly used through traditional virtues in societies. Most people believed that there were hostile spirits, and through each person there was a purpose of their own, which would protect them from demons and harmful enemies that could only be fought throw magic. Even though, Western beliefs about witchcraft increased dramatically in the mythologies and folklore of ancient people, witches in ancient Egypt repeatedly use their
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