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Women In The Nineteenth Century

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Women of the Nineteenth Century were considerably involved in the fight against slavery and racial injustice. It is important to examine their motivations to enter the abolition movement, the ways in which they contributed, and who played major roles. Abolitionism and the campaign for equality for women should also be investigated because they merge together. The Nineteenth Century was a time of reform and women were among the strongest advocates for the human rights movements occurring. The end of slavery was the most important accomplishment of reformers of that time.
Certain groups, such as Quaker women like Lucretia Mott, were working against slavery possibly long before others became involved. There were a number of factors that motivated more women to become involved in the abolition movement. The Market Revolution and the technological production brought about vast changes in family life. Goods that were once produced at home were being purchased
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Anthony as from a young age she witnessed as anti-slavery Quakers gathered at her family's farm. In 1856 she became an Agent for the American Anti-Slavery society which gave her the platform to organize many campaigns. She often endangered her own life for the cause of freedom for slaves. Many abolitionists were in danger but probably none risked themselves in the way the Harriet Tubman did. She was an escaped slave who left the safety of her new land as a free woman to go back and lead others to freedom. She fought tirelessly to free enslaved people and was one of the most important "conductors" of The Underground Railroad (www.harriettubman.com). During the Civil War she acted as a spy for the Union as well as provided medical care to black enlisted men. The importance of Harriet Tubman's sacrifice and contribution to slavery's end is immeasurable. Sojourner Truth was also a former slave who became an amazing preacher that advocated for abolition and the rights of
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