Traditional Gender Roles

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Women are the majority of the world's agricultural producers, playing important roles in all agricultural sectors. The Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO) states that worldwide, women produce more than 50 percent of the food that is grown (FAO, 1995a). Furthermore, in several places of the world, women are often responsible for providing by producing or by earning the income to provide, food for their families. Women have undoubtedly become universally responsible for most things agriculturally related more so in traditional communities and cultures. This paper will analyse the role of women in the agricultural sector, focusing specifically on traditional cultures and communities, as well as looking at the socio-economic…show more content…
In some cases both men and women often have complementary roles, sharing or dividing tasks in crop production, livestock raising, fishing, etc. In other cases, women and men have distinctly different tasks and responsibilities for certain crops and livestock, fish and forests. Where large-scale arming takes place women are often responsible for household food production and small-scale cash cropping with low levels of technology. Overall women, like in most social and economic sectors, play a very secondary role to men when it comes to the agriculture sector. Women do the labour-intensive tasks and men do those tasks that entail strength or involve machinery. While women have increased their work time in agricultural…show more content…
If they had the same access to productive resources as men, they could increase yields on their farms by 20–30%. (The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2012. FAO, 2012). This shows that the labours of women in agriculture are still unappreciated coupled with the fact that most feminine work is informal and often unpaid as it is viewed as most women are unskilled labourers. Research published by FAO (Women and Rural Employment. Policy Brief 5, 2009) shows women are of vital importance to rural economies through their various activities and are responsible for some 60% to 80% of food production in developing countries basically the vast majority, but are now more commonly being restricted to small scale agriculture projects in their communities, restricting them from pursuing more socio-economic empowering
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