Women's Involvement In The Military

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Women’s rights have been a largely debated topic since the beginning of time and it continues to remain relevant in this day and age. Slowly but surely, women have begun to stand up for themselves and continue to make a name for themselves. Moreover, women have entered the works of almost every single industry in the job department. They have transformed the thought of downgrading roles and stereotypes into positive models which affect this generation in a more uplifting manner. (Synthesis) Even though women’s involvement in government is smaller than most would of hoped, women’s rights have been expanding and evolving especially in the home and working world as women now hold major employment positions and it is acceptable for women to work…show more content…
For many centuries, women were meant to support and free men in combat duty. Beginning in the eighteenth century, women took a part in the military by disguising themselves as men. Actions such as these continued into the nineteenth century as well. However, doors began opening in the twentieth century when General George C. Marshall demanded that women be a part of the military. In the 1940s, the Women’s Army Corps was formed which expanded women’s careers throughout military services. Women became known as permanent members of armed services during the late 1940s. At first, a very small amount of females were granted the position of active duty. The army continued to restrict women in combat until their horizons broadened in the 1970s. Eventually, piloting becoming a position that women were able to participate in, starting in the late 1970s. The status of women in the Army raised especially during the 1970s as well. Moreover, the All-Volunteer Force was formed where women volunteered to join in the military. Continuing the evolution of the military, the Army began recruiting even more women to offset the dropping number of males. Mixed training became accepted and is still practiced today. Unfortunately, females are prohibited from services involving the infantry, tanks and artillery. Nowadays, 15% of the armed services is made up of women.…show more content…
Surprisingly, starting in early civilization, women were held to a very high regard. Many cultures worshipped females goddesses as creator of the earth and birth. (Women 2) Certain religions believed women held essential roles in society. Early civilizations even depended on women for survival and prosperity. (Women 1) Buddhists held women to the honor and thought of them as only slightly inferior to men. (Women 3) The Greeks, especially in Athens, felt very similarly because of Athena, the Greek goddess of war and wisdom. Furthermore, Egyptian priestesses were second only to the pharaoh. Priestesses were above all other citizens in the Egyptian community. Sadly, roles and expectations transformed in the colonial age in America. Women’s stereotypical roles were put into place in this age. Various Americans thought that a woman’s duty was to bear a child. The best mothers had the most children. (Miller 69) Apparently, women were viewed as the “weaker vessel” to men. Supposedly, women were misled easily, tempted by flattery and gave into temptations because of they have more delicate souls. (Miller 64) To continue, marriage was viewed as the key to a stable society. Everyone in the colonial community must marry or else the society will become unstable. Additionally, after a women married, everything in her possession became
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