Women's Roles In The Great Gatsby

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In this project I am focusing on women's roles and how they have changed since then. As you may know, women’s roles in society have evolved for the better. We are making our way into the world and changing it for the better. In Great Gatsby, which was set in the 1920’s, gives us a clear example of how things used to be back then. Fitzgerald showcased the change in women's roles in the 1920’s through the styles and the traits of Daisy, Jordan, and Myrtle by their morals, class, and appearance. Back in the 1920’s everything was changing, especially women. We completely erased and rewrote the idea of women and their roles. Drinking and drugs, no morals, and new fasion trends were something an everyday lady did, had, and faced. The Great Gatsby,…show more content…
Women were showing more and wearing less. It blurred the lines between classes and the clothes became more risky. Women were showing more and dressing up. By the 1920’s clothes were being produced faster and faster, cheaper and cheaper, making them available to anyone who desired a new outfit. It started to define you and your lifestyle, either you were rich or you tried like to dress like you were. Daisy was upper class along with Jordan while Myrtle was in the lower class. Daisy and Jordan's style definitely showed their class, they were more elegant and classy with their…show more content…
Women were having affairs and not committing to one man. Divorces were becoming more and more popular. It was becoming more and more common for women to be divorced, in an affair, or pregnant without a husband. Myrtle lived a risky life. She actually had a whole other life with someone who wasn't her husband, Tom. Daisy was in love with Gatsby while she was married to Tom. Jordan didn't really have much of a risky love life, although she was involved in some risky business. We cared less and less about of appearance but at the same time we cared more and more about it. From changing morals, challenging society, and the change in dominance were showcased in Daisy, Jordan, and Myrtle. They challenged the idea of a perfect lady society
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