Workplace Stereotypes

1510 Words7 Pages
Gloria Steinem, the well-known feminist, once said, “We 'll never solve the feminization of power until we solve the masculinity of wealth.” This statement could easily reflect the absurdity of the workplace stereotypes. Workplaces and corporations on the global scale have encountered the imbalanced gender roles and have seen the injustice that is the result. Nonetheless, the government is not keen to show their support for workplace equality or career advancements for women; if we were to see a widespread conversation about this issue, the problem would surely change. Although this topic is not an easily corrected, we should take the time to discuss and find logical solutions to these problems that are so visibly displayed. Doing so would allow…show more content…
Women should not have to fight for workplace equality; it should come naturally, but in most places, that is not the case. In other nations than the United States, it is common to find worst conditions for women and their fight for equality. Women struggle with Government intervention and support for high paying jobs in New Zealand. Lyn Olsthoorn had quite a bit to say on the matter. In her article, "The ongoing struggle for pay equity: the struggle for women to achieve equal pay for work of equal value has been a long one, with setbacks, including legislative repeal, and it 's not over yet.", she discusses how women have struggled for equal pay since 1951, and multiple committees formed because of this. The International Labour Organization was one of these committees to fight back. They created the Equal Remuneration Convention in 1951, which had a sole purpose of making the remuneration of male and female workers. Mirium Long was a member of the Public Service Association and lobbied for women’s equal pay for the length of her career. She recognized the gap for more than half a century; beginning as early as 1950 and continuing until she was no longer in the Public Service. After her long career of speaking out about this issue, several others began to voice their concerns, including the leader of the Opposition, Andrew Little. He said that the pay inequity exceeded the average hourly wages. He spoke out, "According to the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment,…show more content…
Some opinions on this topic state the problem is not government intervention or intervention from employers; it’s in the women’s career choices and the number of hours they take off. There was a particularly interesting article by Ashe Schow. Schow uses the findings of a Harvard Economics Professor to prove her point on what Schow calls “women’s earnings gap.” She believes the issue is due to women’s choices and not discrimination. That women’s career choice, hours they take, and time off all contribute to the gap. Women work fewer hours than men, so when they get paid, the amounts are quite less. She says that due to these factors, the pay gap cannot be eliminated by forcing it to change since the cause is from the choices of individuals. For this reason, the government cannot get involved. If this was the case, the core beliefs of Jyn Wynen, Mirium Long, Unilever, The McKinsey & Company, and many others would, therefore, be invalid. Although women do make choices to limit work-time, the fact is not simply women do not care about workplace habits. In most cases, the choice to which Schow is referring can be more accurately described as women tending to family responsibilities, whereas men have usually handed the responsibility to the women providing her with complex decision making as far as her career. This shows the inequality of stereotypes mentioned earlier. Stereotypes that play a massive role in the advancement of women working high
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