The Role Of Zeus In The Iliad

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Zeus was not satisfied by punishing mankind. He desired to punish the one who had introduced fire to humans, Prometheus. He sent his servants, Force and Violence, to capture Prometheus and take him to the Caucasus Mountains where he was tied with unbreakable chains. In addition, Zeus sent an eagle to bite Prometheus's liver every day for eternity. Since Prometheus had the ability to see the future, Zeus gave him an opportunity to gain his freedom. Prometheus was to reveal to Zeus which son of his would someday dethrone him, according to the prophecy. Prometheus refused and further angered Zeus. Centuries later, Heracles, the son of Zeus, killed the eagle that tormented Prometheus, and Prometheus finally received his freedom. The Greeks viewed Prometheus as a courageous god that fought against tyranny and injustice. His story taught people from different generations to stand up against oppression and to be firm in their beliefs. He…show more content…
One of Greek Mythology's first written records, Homer's “Iliad”, was written 1000 years before the start of Roman Mythology. In addition, the Greek gods are also the Roman gods but with different names. The Greek gods had unique human traits that determined the decisions they would make in the future. Unlike the Roman gods, the Greek gods were usually displayed with a muscular physique, gorgeous hair, and dazzling eyes. What greatly distinguished the Greek culture from other cultures was that its authentic stories were not derived from the mythology of other cultures. The universal myths that constantly appear in different cultures such as the creation, the flood, and the hero stories are believed to have been passed by oral tradition, but the true stories behind the myths remain a mystery. The truth on whether Greek Mythology was inspired by true events or by pure imagination was left interred somewhere in the
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