Feminism Essays

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    In the book of vindication of the right of a woman, Wollstonecraft brings out clearly the roles of a woman in her society and how it has led to oppression of women (Wollstonecraft 22). Wollstonecraft believes that men and women are equal given the same environment and empowerment, women can do anything a man can do. In her society, education for women is only aimed at making her look pleasing to men. Women are treated as inferior being and used by men as sex objects. Wollstonecraft believed that the quality of mind of women is the same with that of men, and therefore women should not be denied a chance for formal education that will empower them to be equal with men.

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    William Shakespeare disseminates various ideas of gender normalities of the Renaissance Era through his play, Taming of the Shrew. Throughout the play, Shakespeare provides archetypes of men and women that reveal the stereotypes of this time period. Furthermore, Shakespeare also displays the relationships between men and women that are expected of this time period. This era meant that women were submissive to men, and men were certainly the dominant gender. Shakespeare identifies in his play that if individuals are to waver from these gender expectations, they would be defying social norms and reaping the consequences of their defiant actions.

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    In the “A Feminist Odyssey,” she uses the term “feminism” to say that she wants every human being to be treated in the same, fair manner. She wanted us to be aware that women dominate the nursing field. “Our generation has given the gift of choice to expand our possibilities, to embrace careers” (99). It was said that a woman could have a job but as soon as she had a baby they would no longer work “Young women expected to limit their aspirations to traditionally female careers” (99). Some profession that comes to mind for “Women’s Work” would be Teacher, Nursing, Housekeeping, Maid, and Housewife’s.

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    People's way of thinking is strongly influenced by the patriarchal scheme of the culture in which they live, and their judgments deriving from this scheme are deeply embedded in their psyche. Gender roles within patriarchal society prescribe the hierarchical roles of men and women assumed to be “natural,” and labeled as “masculine” and “feminine” as if these categories were ontological. In this context, the heterosexual majority regards homosexuals as those who transgress traditional gender roles and thus violate the prescribed rules of the “proper” sexual behavior. It is being supposedly said that gender identity such as masculinity and femininity is not something inherent you born with but, a learned entity, a social construction. When John looks at his father’s penis in the bathroom, Gabriel beats up his son in order for John to become a “proper” man, and must not sexualized the male body.

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    Olympe de Gouges can be considered as the pioneer feminism advocate. Her famous work “Declaration of the Rights of Woman and the Female Citizen” (DRWFC) in 1791 was highly controversial. Her work propagated to place women at the centre of politics and society alongside with men. This was highly contentious as women had been subservient to men for much of history. Her work was grounded in the Enlightenment ideas of thinkers such as Diderot, Voltaire, and Montesquieu who questioned the unequal treatment of women (Racz 1952, 151).

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    Theoretical Background A variety of theoretical approaches to the study of language and gender have developed to account for gender differences in language use. However, interpretation of speech differences between men and women is associated with two main approaches: dominance approach and difference approach. The dominance approach is proposed by researchers such as Lakoff (1975), Spender (1980), and Zimmerman and West (1975). This approach claimed that gender differences in speech are the consequence of unequal distribution of power and status in society.

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    Márquez’s work suggests that he views women’s sexuality in the range between sex critical and sex negative feminism, where women live in a state of subordination confusing rape and intercourse

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    The History Of Feminism

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    For many hundreds of years women have endeavored towards gaining equality with men. They have been repressed and opportunities have been taken from them due to the fact that they are women. Feminism is defined as the theory of political, economic, and social equality of the sexes (www.merriam-webster.com). It is the feminist movement that has been trying to give rights to women who have been impoverished of their equality and immunities that man has been depriving them of. Feminism is allowing women to be many things they weren’t able to be before.

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    Feminism In Persepolis

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    Persepolis, written by Marjane Satrapi, is a memoir depicting the life of a young girl growing up during the Islamic Revolution in Iran during the late 1970’s. Before the Islamic Revolution the country of Iran was run by a westernized ruler called the Shah. After the Shah is overthrown the country’s new government places new religious rules making if obligatory for women, and sometimes men, to wear specific clothing in public. A key theme I picked up on in the book is the theme of rights, specifically women's rights. Marjane Satrapi writes the women and their roles in her book as strong willed and very active in politics.

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    Term gender role is described as a set of social norms of what types of behaviors are generally considered acceptable, appropriate or desirable for a person based on their sex ussualy centered around opposing conceptions of femininity and masculinity. Gender roles traditionally were often divided into distinct feminine and masculine gender roles, until especially the twentieth century when these roles diversified into many different acceptable male or female roles in modernized countries throughout the world. Gender roles are closely linked with gender stereotypes.

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    Patriarchy is the system engrained within our society that promotes men as the dominate and privileged group (Johnson, 6). While patriarchy is a system, sexism and misogyny are the two tools which enforce and benefit from that system. Sexism is defined as a personal prejudice, which reinforces male privilege in society (16). Though it is felt on a more individual level and effects women in different ways, sexism works on a larger scale to have women seen as the inferior and subordinate group (170).

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    She also recognizes that gender inequality is not only an issue to women but to men as well. She states in her speech that gender stereotypes encompasses both men and women, thus it cages men as well. According to her, men suffer mentally due to the lack of help that they receive emotionally since men have this certain fear that when they open up emotionally, they would be deemed as less of a man. (Cole, 2014). Watson (2014) says “We are struggling for a uniting word, but the good news is that we have a uniting movement.”

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    Patriarchal society degrades Lady Macbeth and controls her such a way which they want and make her insignificant. In The Second Sex, Simon De Beauvoir (267) puts that “one is not born a woman, but becomes one.” Men hold the dominate position and women subordinate because men think “this is now bone of my bones and flesh of my flesh; she shall be called woman, because she was taken out of man” (Genesis, cited in Joubert 192). Though “women are measured by the standard of men and found inferior” (Nayar 88), and “a woman becomes a woman, or ‘possesses’ a woman’s identity because she plays the role of women repeatedly” (Nayar 91), Lady Macbeth shows her intellect to achieve the goal and becomes evil because the society doesn’t tolerate her intellect and work by which she can succeed. The society treats

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    In the play, there is this new concept of feminism built within the female characters. Miller demonstrates this through the Sue. In the 1940s, men were shipped off to war making them abandon their post in the workplace. This leave of absence allowed women to take over their positions and give them a new power that they never had before. Though her husband Jim still holds the prominent job in the relationship, Sue asserts her female dominance over him by paying for his medical school.

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    Subordinate men only exist because they are measured in relation to hegemonic masculinity. Even so, as a group, subordinate men can still access power and privilege by aspiring to hegemonic masculine traits (Messner, 1997). Emphasised femininity implies that individuals are orientated to accommodate the desires and interests of men (Kilduff & Mehra, 1996). Women who possess hegemonic masculine characteristics, such as successful, competitive and physically superior women, are often seen as threats to men, unfeminine and ‘bad’ (Vescio, Schlenker & Lenes, 2010). However, the more women possess opposite traits of hegemonic

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    Peter Winn Feminism

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    In his book, Peter Winn attempts to explain how the Yarur mill - “symbol of social struggle” - takeover marked a turning point for the Chilean revolution, with workers as central protagonists. Winn bases his book on qualitative data, by using oral history with numerous interviews, direct quotations from workers alongside government statistics, private sector information, union minutes and external journalism. This approach gives an encompassing idea of how developments were happening the factory. He narrates the unfolding of the revolution from below, through the eyes of the workers, he quotes “This is their story, which I have tried to tell as much as possible through their eyes and words” (p.7). Finally, he explain how the idea of giving back Chile’s wealth to the workers started and died with the workers movement.

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    The older connotation of the word is “women’s rights” and “gaining women’s rights for the purpose of making women equal to men.” We now define feminism as “the theory of the political, economic, and social equality of the sexes” (Merriam-Webster). One of the reasons the definition has mutated so many times is because of the gradual shift in gender roles society has achieved through time. Currently men and women are not equal, but they are the closest thing to equal since the beginning of man. We still have problems of equal pay, objectification, sexism, and so much more, but thankfully not at the extremes of what it once was.

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    The focal point is on the individual in the social context. It investigates the roles that society has assigned to women and men. Another term discussed in this text is feminism whose definitions are considered to be vast and varied. At the most elemental level, a feminist is someone who is of opinion women and men should be treated equally. Thus it becomes apparent the belief in gender equality is the central feature of feminism, however, activism is also considered as being an important feature of feminism for certain individuals.

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    Feminist researchers also treat knowledge as situated because they make the assumption that particular structures are defined as facts external to and constraining upon people. In addition, feminist researchers are aware of the varying degrees of oppression in relation to a woman's social location and in relation to men, thus necessitating prising apart the category men and women's experiences of different men in different times, places and circumstances .Feminist research differs from mainstream research in that it rejects using research to colonize material differences among women. This is done by presenting a social constructionist and non-essentialist notion

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    Feminist Movement

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    History of the feminist movement The feminist movement, or simply feminism, is a name given to designate movements and ideologies which are intent on achieving equal rights for women and men. While feminists around the world have undertaken diverse measures and have set themselves different goals, varying from one country to another and changing through time, most Western feminist theorists agree that all the movements aimed at the improvement of women's condition should be classified as feminist, whether or not they refer this term to themselves (Walters 2005). Although many researchers, including the authors of A Feminist Reader, Sharon M. Harris and Linda K. Hughes, claim that the origins of the feminist movement could be observed as early

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