A Clockwork Orange Essays

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    Should individuals submit to their government or to society? Is it worth losing their self-determination? In both Aldous Huxley’s, Brave New World, and Anthony Burgess’s, A Clockwork Orange, the objectives of the government to maintain power and stability are alike, while its methods of upholding such rigid control over the people are different. The government’s authority has a profound effect on society that is apparent in both novels when assessing the value of free will to an individual.

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    All forms of art are commonly interpreted differently based on varied ethnicity, language, culture, age, race etcetera. Novels have constantly been in the limelight for featuring content that is unsettling to certain people. My essay aims to explore how A Clockwork Orange can be read and interpreted differently by readers in liberal democratic nations and readers in communist nations. A Clockwork Orange is Anthony Burgess 's revolt towards indoctrination and governmental repression.

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    A Clockwork Orange is set in a dystopian society, controlled by a restrictive, tyrannical government and denotes a substantial disaccord between the citizens and the state. The novel is narrated by fifteen-year-old Alex, who speaks in a fictitious argot known as Nadsat. Alex and his ‘droogs’ (5) – Dim, Pete, and Georgie – venture the streets in ‘ultra-violence’ (5), attacking, robbing, and raping whoever they please. One night, Alex is arrested amidst another criminal act, putting his ‘ultraviolence’ to an end. In prison, Alex is offered to take part in an experimental behaviour modification treatment, known as the Ludovico’s Technique (91) – an aversion therapy believed to eradicate his violent tendencies – in return for a reduced sentence.

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    We all know of movies that have fermented court cases, murders and rapes. But do you know that there a few movies where the actors themselves left the set because they were traumatized to that extent? Honestly, I love controversial movies. I appreciate the courage it takes to make a movie with the prior knowledge that the press is going to line-up in front of your house for all the wrong reasons. These movies, generally, don’t involve any form of manipulation.

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    A Clockwork orange, which I will now refer to as (ACO), is a film directed by Stanley Kubrick and was realised in 1971, is an astonishing piece of exposition around the book of the same name. The movie explores many themes all of which hold significant meaning towards duplicity in the way in which a country is governed. A large amount of this meaning can be found within Cat-Lady scene, where is twofaced narrator Alex brakes into to the unsuspecting victims household; to exert his dominance over his droogs after they questioned his leadership. ‘The New Way’ one of the droogs states, this reflected later in the movie by one of the politicians, it gives a nice comparison between the gang culture that is represent as primal activity and the politics that governs the world they

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    Code and Cinematic Signs of A Clockwork Orange Stanley Kubrick is famous for his dark humor movies. He used a lot of codes and signs to express his stylish aesthetic violence and sexual implications in his movies. A Clockwork Orange can be considered as one of the best among them. In the opening milk-bar scene with the mannequins, the bar is full of sexual imagery.

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    Have you ever read a book and laughed at something that made you think afterwards? This is called thoughtful laughter. Thoughtful laughter is when a situation utilizes humor to provoke reflection. Candide and a Clockwork Orange both demonstrate thoughtful laughter but in different ways. The authors use of satirical humor contributes to this.

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    The first chapter of Anthony Burgess’s novel A Clockwork Orange begins unlike anything we have ever read. From the first sentence to the last, the reader is faced with vocabulary that is unfamiliar and a narrative style that demands careful attention. This essay will focus primarily on diction and its historical context but also on the novel’s form. First of all, the unfamiliar language in this novel, while it may be straining, is ultimately intriguing.

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    Within this passage, the narcissistic nature of Alex’s character becomes clear. Specifically, just as narcissism is the “excessive interest in oneself,” Alex’s thoughts are driven by internal desires (OED). For instance, rather than being able to appreciate external and worldly objects, or concepts such as, the talks given on beetles or the Milky Way, he manipulates these topics back from a broader picture to the those that most interest or concern himself like committing acts of violence. This is further seen through Alex’s apparent lack of empathy. Notably, when learning of the death of his so called “droog,” or friend Georgie, Alex is incapable of expressing any “awareness and sensitivity” towards him.

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    Anthony Burgess’ 1962 book A Clockwork Orange is a dystopian coming of age story that presents a society controlled by a totalitarian government set on making its citizens obedient by essentially turning them into robots. The story is told through the lens of Alex, the story’s fifteen year old antihero and protagonist, who is the leader of an all boy teenage street gang who he calls his “droogs.” The gang has even invented their own language called “Nadsat” as a way of communicating among each other. With his friends, Alex participates in vicious violent and criminal acts from which they derive pleasure. He is eventually captured and experimented on by the government.

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    In the novel “A Clockwork Orange”, key words and phrases are repeatedly used throughout the book. The book’s passage itself resembles that of a sonata, where the first and 3rd part of the book are upbeat, while the 2nd part goes in a more slow, fluent style. These patterns in the book represent the important themes of the book, including the power of language, ego and superego, and the free will of human beings. The opening phrase of each part of the book, “What’s it going to be then, eh?”

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    Language in the film and novel A Clockwork Orange plays a significant role in not only narrating the plot but also conveying the message of the novel and film. In this essay I will be discussing the function of language and cinematic techniques in the A Clockwork Orange and how serves as a tool to; brainwash the reader and viewer, veil the violent actions that takes place and show Alex the protagonist’s manipulative power through the use of Nadsat. Burgess stated that he uses Nadsat as a brainwashing device in the novel A Clockwork Orange. The use of Nadsat causes the reader to actively interact with the language, because the reader is curious and motivated to master Nadsat, thus making Nadsat a “positive reinforcer”

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    Colloquialisms are often used in literature to give their character more lifelike qualities. If the character speaks with their own slang it gives the character more defining qualities and makes them more memorable. Burgess uses colloquialisms to the fullest with his character Alex in A Clockwork Orange. Alex has his own slang that he uses throughout the entire book, which makes him an extremely different and memorable character. Alex uses his slang very early in the book, on page two Alex states, "There was me, that is Alex, and my three droogs, that is Pete, Georgie, and Dim, Dim being really dim..."(Burgess 1.1.2).

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    Anthony Burgess, the author of A Clockwork Orange, said “… by definition, a human is endowed with free will. He can use this to choose between good and evil. If he can only perform good or only perform evil, then he is a clockwork orange… it is as inhuman to be totally good as it is to be totally evil. The most important thing is moral choice” (Burgess, Introduction, page xiii). This theme is thoroughly explored during the novel, as well as during modern history.

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    Code and Cinematic Signs of A Clockwork Orange Stanley Kubrick is famous for his dark humor movies. He used a lot of codes and signs to express his stylish aesthetic violence and sexual implications in his movies. A Clockwork Orange can be considered as one of the best among them. In the opening milk-bar scene with the mannequins, the bar is full of sexual imagery.

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    The 1971 film, A Clockwork Orange, consists of many psychological concepts. Two concepts in particular seem to have the biggest impact and role throughout this film. These concepts being, classical conditioning and the idea that our environment and our experiences of nurture are what shapes us. A Clockwork Orange is the story of a group of young men who take pleasure in committing crimes and causing others to feel pain, they call themselves the “Droogs”. Alex, the group leader, suffers from Antisocial Personality Disorder, a disorder also known as “psychopath”.

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    Humanity Stripped Bare: Semiotical and Sartorial Sinning in A Clockwork Orange 's Nadsat Koshtoom Back in the non-permissive age, life was safe and secure, yet for many simultaneously desperately and appallingly dull. The rise of the late postwar generation in the 1960s fell together with rapid socioeconomic change, which led to an extravagant explosion of youth culture. This sudden surge of abundance contemporaneously questioned the framework of former rigidity, and gave birth to debates of existentialism, sexuality and violence. One novella that defies the edges of reason and convention, is Burgess ' A Clockwork Orange, a work in which the merely fifteen-year-old Alex attempts to seek out the limits of control in a frenzy of rape, murder and anti-establishment acts, all defined by the grotesque and the bizarre. Alex inebriates himself, beats, rapes and murders by the dozens (and Burgess ' makes sure to inject the necessary doze of T&A to keep even the light reader entertained), but essentially Alex ask himself the question many youths at the time (in every stratosphere of society) ultimately asked themselves: is this really all there is?

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    Moreover, both Alex and Patrick are defined as narcissists in that they snap at the smallest insults to their sense of superiority. Within ‘A Clockwork Orange’ the reader consistently is confronted by Alex’s sense of superiority. This is because the novel is narrated through the perspective of Alex. The violence that Alex and his “droogs” are involved in is seen through the mindset of the narcissist (Alex). In the beating of the drunk by Alex and his “droogs” Alex states “I could never stand to see a moodge all filthy and rolling and burping and drunk, whatever age might be.”

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    Lack of Identity In A Clockwork Orange Identity is a very important aspect of a human’s life. In the novel A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess, he explores the topic of loss and lack of identity. Anthony Expresses the fact that a person that lacks identity ceases to be a true human being. The novel revolves around a felonious juvenile boy named Alex, who resides with act of malicious violence and ruthless rape.

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    In literature, especially novels taking place in the future in the dystopian genre, the society has normally changed so much that either the main language has changed entirely, or that new languages are formed in order for sub-cultures or opposition groups to still develop and operate without conforming. In the case of quasi-dystopian novel “A clockwork Orange” The protagonist and his group of friends speak an argot called Nadsat. In many of these books the language not only serves to add depth to the setting, but also adds heavier meaning to the dialogue and themes portrayed via characterization in the book. For example, in “1984” the language “Newspeak” is extremely robotic, with a set amount of words, with most emotional concepts lacking

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