À rebours Essays

  • Examples Of Innocence In The Blue Bouquet

    904 Words  | 4 Pages

    Innocence is a trait that disappears with experience; we are unable to earn it back once we have lost it. We often correspond innocence with the idea of adolescence and unknowing and experience with wisdom and maturity. This is true in all cases, we grow each and every day and have many experiences where we learn new and different things, but we can never unlearn what was already taught we can only forget. “The Blue Bouquet” by Octavio Paz portrays this idea of the personal journey from innocence

  • The Great Gatsby Pathological Narcissism Analysis

    887 Words  | 4 Pages

    The Great Gatsby, a surrealist novel written by F. Scott Fitzgerald, has been praised as an American classic. One of the main intrigues of this novel is the character of Jay Gatsby, an enigmatic and wealthy man who becomes the subject of the book. There are dissenting opinions on the mysterious character of Jay Gatsby and what he represents. While Jay Gatsby has been characterized as a sinister gangster and a classic romantic, it is more probable that he is a pathological narcissist with slightly

  • Innocence In The Blue Bouquet

    904 Words  | 4 Pages

    Innocence is a trait that disappears with experience; we are unable to earn it back once we have lost it. We often correspond innocence with the idea of adolescence and unknowing and experience with wisdom and maturity. This is true in all cases, we grow each and every day and have many experiences where we learn new and different things, but we can never unlearn what was already taught we can only forget. “The Blue Bouquet” by Octavio Paz portrays this idea of the personal journey from innocence

  • Gothic Literature Analysis

    974 Words  | 4 Pages

    CHAPTER ONE INTRODUCTION Mention the gothic, and many readers will probably picture gloomy castles ... However, the truth is that the gothic genre has continued to flourish and evolve … producing some of its most interesting and accomplished examples in the 20th century-in literature, film and beyond – Carlos Ruiz Zafon.1 1.1. Gothic Meaning and Definition Notoriously, Gothic is hard to confine. This term signifies variety of meanings. As a historical term, Gothic derives from “Goth,” the

  • The Importance Of Creation In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

    761 Words  | 4 Pages

    There is one big question in Frankenstein by Mary Shelley that everyone asks and that is “Who is more human, Frankenstein or his creation?” and the answer to that is his creation. The reason the creation is more human than Frankenstein is because Frankenstein is neglectful and cruel to his creation. Frankenstein does not take any responsibility for his creation and acts like his creation is nothing to him. Frankenstein condemns the creature to loneliness and persecution. The creature is not a monster

  • Portrait Of Dorian Gray

    844 Words  | 4 Pages

    4. Separation In love with himself alone, he finds a perverted pleasure in the constant comparison of his reflection in a mirror with an increasingly repulsive portrait: “He grew more and more enamoured of his own beauty, more and more interested in the corruption of his own soul” (Wilde 106). Dorian felt under Lord Henry influence, who in turn encourages Dorian to live a “life of sensual pleasure, while he himself enjoys looking on from a safe intellectual distance. Herein lies the Mephistophelean

  • Beowulf Film Analysis

    1117 Words  | 5 Pages

    The hero of the film was quite ambiguous at the beginning. At first it was suggested that maybe Raoul (charming, poetic, kind), the French writer would be the hero, when she suggested that Diana return to Europe with him and even tried to plead his case with Ahmed, which worked. However, in the end it is revealed that Ahmed is in fact the hero after he says that he is willing to let Raoul take Diana for her own safety despite the fact that he loved her and would live the rest of his life in loneliness

  • Homoeroticism In Dorian Gray

    1329 Words  | 6 Pages

    Phompassorn Thanatkittiphong (Jane) 5721650567 Sec.809 The Parallels between the Myth of Narcissus and the Picture of Dorian Gray The picture of Dorian Gray is an 1819 philosophical novel written by Oscar Wilde. The major theme of this novel presents a trap of vanity or self-adoration. In the novel, Dorian Gray is the protagonist who is a young beautiful boy with feminine mannerisms. He symbolizes homoeroticism behaviors. Furthermore, the picture of Dorian Gray manifests the stage of social

  • Analysis Of Oscar Wilde's The Picture Of Dorian Gray

    711 Words  | 3 Pages

    Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray supports the idea that one should be careful what they wish for, as it may come true. Dorian Gray, the main character, makes a wish that a painting will change instead of him throughout his future. In the novel of The Picture of Dorian Gray, by Oscar Wilde, the deterioration of Dorian Gray, and the way he progressively becomes a worse of a person shows how the author, Oscar Wilde, added himself into the novel as a character to show the world how he sees himself

  • The Importance Of Being Wild Analysis

    1549 Words  | 7 Pages

    When Films Get Wilde A look back on the 2002 adaptation of Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Wild. At the turn of the 20th century, Oscar Wilde's star flickered out in the French Country side leaving one last bit of witticism to tide the world over until his plays would come back into popularity; or more aptly society stopped putting a block on his works. The overall sum of his 46 years mostly resides in the unique way he could turn a phrase and write entertaining stories where all the action

  • Dorian Gray Transformation

    873 Words  | 4 Pages

    Timed Writing 1 Dorian Gray, in The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde, experiences many changes throughout the book. The main influence of this transformation was Lord Henry, but on the opposing end was Basil. The changes that Dorian had experienced were enough to ignite a spark in him to change his frame of mind, from a young innocent man into a vain hedonist. After Dorian had determined what he was seeking was not physical, he set out to find pleasure through corrupt relations and life experiences

  • Vanity In Dorian Gray

    864 Words  | 4 Pages

    According to the online dictionary of Merriam Webster, vanity is described as: “The Quality of people who have too much pride in their own appearance, abilities, achievements (…) The Quality of being vain” and “Something (such a belief or a way of behaving) which shows that you have too much pride in yourself, your social status, etc.” In my opinion, these descriptions fit the corrupted Dorian Gray perfectly. Dorian was a pure, innocent boy, until he was corrupted by Lord Henry, which made him aware

  • Women And Femininity In Thomas Mann's Death In Venice

    1181 Words  | 5 Pages

    German novelist, Thomas Mann in his novella, Death in Venice suggests that Death in Venice suggests that the lack of feminine presence is a major problem in Aschenbach’s life. He lacks inspiration and women are commonly used by male artists as muses. Aschenbach lives his life with a majority of male influences which causes him to be attracted to Tadzio’s “feminine traits” and without a female character in his life, Aschenbach lacks proper morality. Mann supports his claim by showing that without

  • Summary: La Leyenda Negra About Spanish Colonialism?

    1643 Words  | 7 Pages

    HISTORICAL DISINFORMATION 12. La leyenda negra about Spanish colonialism: explain. The Leyenda Negra (black legend) of the Spanish Inquisition is a term used by those authors who consider the existence of a fantasized or exaggerated of the Spanish Inquisition as the architype of terror and human barbarity. It was an exaggeration because many of the stories were not true or at least not in the way they were told. For example, part of this Leyenda Negra tells that the inquisition killed almost the

  • Good And Evil In A Clockwork Orange

    1148 Words  | 5 Pages

    A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess is a dystopian novel that was published in 1962. It depicts a period of time where a reckless, disrespectful culture specific to younger people has emerged. Within the novel, Burgess brings to light one significant idea in particular. This concept is that free will, and a balance of good and evil are a fundamental part of human nature. Through various examples, A Clockwork Orange displays that, without these crucial factors a person loses their humanity, the

  • Why Is Dorian Gray Gone Wild

    710 Words  | 3 Pages

    Dorian Gray Gone Wilde Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray supports the idea that one should be careful what they wish for, as it may come true. Dorian Gray, the main character, makes a wish that a painting will change instead of him throughout his future. In the novel of The Picture of Dorian Gray, by Oscar Wilde, the deterioration of Dorian Gray, and the way he progressively becomes a worse of a person shows how the author, Oscar Wilde, added himself into the novel as a character to show

  • Dorian Gray Good Vs Evil Essay

    997 Words  | 4 Pages

    As soon as Dorian enters in Chapter 2 of The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wildes’ one and only novel, its is evident that there will be a battle between who will have the most influence on his pure, untouched soul. Basil Hallward, a painter and worshipper of art is an optimist and sees only the good in even the wickedest of people, such as Lord Henry. Lord Henry is a charming, self-indulgent aristocrat that shapes and molds Dorian to lead a life devoted to pleasure. Both Basil and Lord Henry represent

  • Femininity In Dorian Gray

    3872 Words  | 16 Pages

    Introduction The Picture of Dorian Gray is one of the most discussed works in English literature, provoking, just shortly after its publishing, a whole storm of indignation. Only six years earlier, J.K. Huysmans Á Rebours had been published in France and marked the apogee of its author. Both works are considered to be the cornerstones of symbolist, decadent and aesthetic writing. However, too often these works were (due to their scandalizing content) overlooked in their hermeneutics and mistaken

  • Pat Brassington's Foreboding

    515 Words  | 3 Pages

    the domestic and childhood within this work. The pillows pattern, which reappears throughout Brassington’s extensive oeuvre, has been suggested by Engberg to add a “feminine monstrosity to the muted subject - mostly a child.” (Pat Brassington: À Rebours 2012). The feminine qualities are implied through the use of a soft blooming floral pattern onto a mundane household object. The pillow fabrics evocative references to the mother, the household, and asphyxiation all suggest that the subject is a child

  • Moreau's Husband: A Cultural Criticism

    578 Words  | 3 Pages

    "conflicting symbolism", a "beauty of inertia" and a "necessary richness" which emphasizes the "wholly arbitrary and irrational character" of Salome herself. Joris Karl Huysmans gives a prominent description of the Salome painting in his novel A Rebours (1884). The novel 's protagonist, has acquired Moreau 's painting, considering it to incarnate the very spirit of decadence; it is one of the few works of art which send him into raptures of delight. Huysmans ' lengthy description of the painting