Athenian democracy Essays

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    According to Socrates perspective, the democracy of Athens was corrupt and even though they courts were made in such a way that everyone was judged fairly, it wasn’t such because there were no rules or principles set forth. When a person was brought to court in the Athenian court and the person spoke against the jurors or offended them, he or she could be prosecuted based on that. In summary, judgment was passed based on emotion rather than on justice. In the Apology, Socrates stated, “my present

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    In the 4th and 5th century in Athens, Greece a new form of government arose. It was called a democracy. The word democracy derives from the words, demos meaning entire citizen body, and kratos which means rule. Compared to the other forms of government during this time it was very different. Instead of being ruled my emperors or the upper class, the democracy allowed all male citizens to have equal political rights, freedom of speech, and the opportunity to participate in their government. “The Athens’

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    The Democracy of Athens meant that the people rule themselves. It was easy for the Athenians to see who the people are due to the population number at the time. Therefore, they could easily make decisions. The biggest difference between Athenian democracy and almost all other democracies is that the Athenians had a direct democracy rather than being representative. The city-state of Athens, 5th century Athens to be precise, is the inventor and first practitioner of democracy. One of the earliest

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    The Democracy of Athens Athens was, in the ideals of the time it was prevailing, a democracy. Run by a government occupied with elected officials, and a judge/jury system to maintain the peace. It existed during the third century A.D and onward, producing philosophers akin Aristotle and Plato, who went on to influence the idea of democracy in concurrent civilization. The definition of democracy is, as taken from Encyclopedia Britannica, literally, rule by the people. Such a term is derived from

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    The pure democracy of Athens did not only concern itself of the people, for the people but prioritized by the people more than current democracies. The Athenian government required large amounts of machinery and paraphernalia as a result of the mass citizen participation in government. As a result of this, historians are able to evaluate the Athenian government through material remains found in the center of civic life, the Agora. Thus, enabling a vivid depiction of the purity of democracy in ancient

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    Athenian Democracy

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    During 5th century BCE, the social and political reform by Solon in Athens became Athenian democracy. He gave lower class such as farmers the right to speak in political decisions even though it was very limited. He redeemed the farmers of their debt and enslavement and focused on trades and businesses which allowed the emergence of a prosperous urban trading class. Solon divided the Athenians into four classes, based on their wealth and their ability to perform military service. The poorest class

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    The origin of the word ‘democracy’ itself stems from the Greek for demos, meaning the people, and of the verb kratos, meaning to rule. The root of the word, demokratias, deriving from Greek insists that democracy itself first came into fruition in ancient Athens. This starting point of democracy in Athens marked a momentous advance in the politics of organised society and in which way said society should be governed. While ancient Athens is held to an almost unreal standard for producing a groundbreaking

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    definitions. However, to the Athenian democracy, three main definitions were essentially presented. The first definition of Demos in the Greek language means a village. In the Athenian state, the village was regarded as the smallest unit of the administrative setup. It is compared to a voting center or precinct where eligible male citizens would often congregate to be enlisted as a member of the assembly. According to Blackwell (2003), there were specific requirement Athenian male citizens had to meet

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    One of the most powerful legacies from the Athenian Greeks is democracy. The Athenian leader Cleisthenes created the first Athenian Democracy. In democratic Athens full citizens were expected to run the Government. Cleisthenes introduced a system of political reforms called Demokratia meaning “rule by the people”. The system was made up of three separate institutions the ekklesia a sovereign governing body that made decisions about war and foreign policy, wrote and revised laws and approved or condemned

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    city states, specifically Athens. Athenian reformers moved toward democracy, rule by the people. In Athens citizens participated directly in political decision making. However there were limitations on citizenship to ensure that only the most rational people were able to vote. Through the construction of democracy in Athens, equality of all citizens became greater, and the city would become the top democracy of all the democracies. The first step toward democracy was when Draco, a nobleman, came

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    The concept of leadership was prevalent in the ancient world. It had a place in the way the people of ancient times governed their lives. Greece, and especially Athens, is the cradle of democracy in the western civilization. Athens owes the first penal and civil law code to Draco. An outstanding statesman and poet called Solon acted in Athens at the same time as Draco. In 594 BC he was elected the first archon, the highest state official who today could be compared to a prime minister. The difference

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    When talking about empires, a negative connotation of being oppressed is usually present. Living in the modern age, we tend to consider democracy as the “rightest form of government”. However, democracy is not simply “freedom for all” or “the will of the people” for ancient empires. It was a complex, delicate system that sometime people overlook its inherent fragility. Many democratic states, such as ancient Athens, the Roman Republic, failed to keep the promise of freedom for all and ended up in

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    The Government of Athens wasn’t known to be the best one. Compared to Oligarchy, the Athenian democracy is a poor form of government. Athenian democracy is considered weak and is run by weak-minded people. Mostly lethargic and incompetent people are brought to the power saying that they all have equal rights. It becomes an issue in democracy when we need someone strong willed to lead the rest of the people in the society. Oligarchy is better in that sense; it always chooses the most capable and knowledgeable

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    look at the literal definition of democracy in the Merriam-Webster dictionary, there is a decently large explanation. When looking at this definition and trying to decide whether the Athenian democratic system was truly democratic, one would have to go with the answer no. While it has been stated that Athens is the “cradle of democracy”, and that it was better than any of the other governments in the world, it was still a work in progress. The Athenian democracy, while it did give more power to the

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    a citizen in the government. Moreover, addressing the 11 million undocumented immigrants, I strongly believe that the United States should allow the immigrants to continuously live in the United States under some conditions. The Athenian Democracy remains a novel and captivating analysis in direct majority rules system where the general population don 't choose delegates to vote for their sake yet vote on enactment and official bills in their own privilege. The Roman Republic was all

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    The stability of the Roman Republic and the Athenian Democracy is similar because they both had internal problems based on low income, yet the systems are different because participation in Rome was related to wealth, while participation in Athens wasn’t. To start, the stability of the Roman Republic and the Athenian Democracy was similar because they both had internal fights and reforms due to wealth.Specifically, the Gracchi brothers were a large part of the populares political group in Rome because

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    Athenian democracy only lasted around two centuries, and the system was introduced in 507 B.C by an Athenian named Cleisthenes. The democratic political system of Athens was often referred to as the "demos", which translates to "the people". This meant that it was governed by the rule of the people of Athens. The three most important parts of the system included the ekklesia (the Assembly), the council of 500 men that represented the ten Athenian tribes (The Boule) and lastly, the popular courts

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    Democracy, a form of government, allows the people in their own nationality to vote for people in order for them to become representatives as a result to vote on new laws that would affect their own nationality. One of the many states of Greece, ancient Athens was indeed not truly democratic as a result of not inclusive, other than male citizens, to gain authority in ancient Athens, ¨Demokratia was ruled by male citizens only, excluding women, free foreigners(Metics) and slaves.¨(Document D), therefore

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    cities of Athens and Sparta. Athens and Sparta are both known for, but not limited to, their military and political power. Sparta is known for their impeccable military and utter brutality. Athens is known for their contribution to the creation of democracy. Even though both of these cities were two most influential societies to the modern day they do differ in many aspects. Athens military procedures were not nearly as brutal as Sparta’s. Sparta’s politics were ran differently than how Athens did.

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    Pericles Golden Age

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    towards a “true” democracy and extended wealth, power and cultural influence of the Athenian empire unlike any other politician in Athenian history. Whilst he did not single-handedly delivered Athens into its Golden Age, Pericles’ beneficial reforms and policies provoked and motivated the Athenians to labor towards an ideal Athens. Without Pericles, Athens would have no one as wise

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