Flood Essays

  • Boscastle Flood

    1107 Words  | 5 Pages

    Boscastle Flood Red Box Case Study Location and Dates On Monday 16 August 2004 a devastating flood hit the two towns of Boscastle and Crackington Haven, Cornwall. Boscastle with a population of only 888 was a thriving fishing village near the South West Coast of England. The flood destroyed most of the town and caused a decrease in the developed infrastructure. It is estimated that 440 million gallons of water reached the town which were as a consequence of three rivers bursting their banks and

  • Essay On Flood In Kuching

    727 Words  | 3 Pages

    The most recent flood occur in Kuching, Sarawak where heavy rainfall caused some areas around Kuching to be inundated by flood waters and most roads became congested as they were impassable to traffic. The heavy downpour was still continuing around Kuching and several stalled vehicles were left on the flooded roads. Several key places were flooded including the Sarawak General Hospital, Sarawak Contingent Police Headquarters at Jalan Badaruddin, Padungan fire and rescue station, Faculty of Medicine

  • Severe Flood Research Paper

    1462 Words  | 6 Pages

    generic definition for flood is something like this: It is an overflow of a quite large amount of water that goes beyond the normal level at a given area which is normally considered a dry land. But this simple definition hardly captures the picture of the disaster a flood can become and the damage it can wreak on a locality. With rapidly increasing unpredictability of the weather patterns globally and a number of natural and man-made factors interfering with the environment, a flood is a more common

  • Flash Flood In Birmingham

    633 Words  | 3 Pages

    According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Flood Insurance Study Birmingham, Alabama is “relatively flat and highly urbanized, with storm runoff directed through storm sewering into streams” (FEMA, 2010, pg 18). The concern is the runoff “sometimes exceeding the capacity of the streams to safely transport the water downstream” (FEMA, 2010) which has caused millions of dollars in flood damage. Lindell, Prater & Perry (2007) describe flash flooding occurring “when

  • The Johnstown Flood Analysis

    1190 Words  | 5 Pages

    The Johnstown Flood , by David McCullough. 1968 in New York. 302 pages. The main theme of the Johnstown Flood is how risky and dangerous it is to expect from individuals that are in positions of responsibility are acting responsibly. The Johnstown flood is a story of humans manipulating nature without due understanding and caution. David McCullough was born on July 7, 1993 ,and raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Known as the ‘master of the art of narrative history’, is an American writer, narrator

  • The Johnstown Flood: A Natural Disaster

    1426 Words  | 6 Pages

    The Johnstown Flood was caused by a man made lake, it was constructed in 1881. The dam was 900 feet by 72 feet. The dam was one of the largest earth dams, which means it was made by things like rocks and dirt instead of cement or steel which bridges are mostly made of. Johnstown was built on the Appalachian Plateau. It was the center of the South Fork Fishing and Hunting Club. The lake had been used for fishing and sailing. Before the dam broke, there had been many warnings that it was possible that

  • David Mccullough's The Johnstown Flood

    900 Words  | 4 Pages

    “Johnstown Flood” was a chaotic result for a small middle class family, natural disasters happen so much in one’s lifetime and can be emotionally crippling. This natural disaster caused many families and homes to come crashing down, all the townspeople shed tears that day as they watched their homes and loved ones float away with the water. The parents, wives, and husbands all looked in horror as they watched their family die in front of them. David McCullough’s story “Johnstown Flood” deals with

  • Climate Change: A Case Study

    1645 Words  | 7 Pages

    Floods are natural phenomena. They can, however, turn into disasters causing widespread damage, health problems and even deaths. This is especially the case where rivers have been cut off from their natural floodplains, are confined to man-made channels, and where houses and industrial sites have been constructed in areas that are naturally liable to flooding. (ICPDR, 2013) The international community is very active in participating the climate change program. Climate Change is a big issue because

  • Epic Of Gilgamesh And Genesis Essay

    765 Words  | 4 Pages

    exception (Carl Sargon)”. According to The Epic of Gilgamesh and Genesis, unprecedented floods occurred in the stories. The exception fell on the kind men, Utnapishtim and Noah: they survived the powerful event of destruction. However, in the same theme of the stories, there are sources of similarity and differences. Even though both The Epic of Gilgamesh and Genesis are similar in that they all used the floods for the destruction, both the stories are different from each other in distributing roles

  • The Three Generations In Edmund Burke's The River King

    1286 Words  | 6 Pages

    Edmund Burke was an author and philosopher who once said that, “Those who don't know history are destined to repeat it (“Edmund Burke Quotes”). This quote means that people who do not know or understand the past and the mistakes or events made often are destine to repeat those mistakes or events. Throughout the book, The River King, there are 3 different generations, and in each generations there was a couple that the book focused on. It started with, Annie Howe and Dr. Howe’s generation, then

  • Natural Disasters

    3756 Words  | 16 Pages

    The impact of flood (2010) on productivity of major crops in Sindh, Pakistan INTROCUCTION A Natural disaster is an adverse and unpredictable event which generates from the natural processes of earth causes great economic, property and life damages, it includes Earthquakes, Droughts, Storms, Tsunamis, cyclones, Volcanic eruptions etc. The severity of natural disaster is function of the affected people’s resilience (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_disaster). Flood is one of them

  • Case Study: Oroville

    370 Words  | 2 Pages

    The Oroville dam was built in 1968, in California. It lies on the Feather River, east of the city Oroville. The dam has many important uses including; flood control, hydroelectric power generation, water shortage, and water quality improvement in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. Lake supplies up to 4.2 million acre-feet of water a year, Oroville is the biggest reservoir in the State Water Project, both to farmers and more than 25 million Californians who depend on it for at least part of their

  • The Importance Of Creation Myths

    816 Words  | 4 Pages

    Greeks also believed there was a great flood which created the Iron race. Ancient Aztecs also believed there were five races of humans which are the first sun, second sun, third sun, fourth sun, and fifth sun which we are currently a part of. The Hebrews and Christians had a majority of the population of earth destroyed by a flood. The Babylonians believed there was a great war between gods that did some damage to the earth. The Yorubas believed that a great flood had happened. The Maori god Tawhirimatea

  • Observations About The River

    314 Words  | 2 Pages

    What were the three most notable observations about the river and it’s surroundings that you made during lab 2? (3 points). -1). The riverbank was extremely high and sloped.2) Building were at least 50ft away due to potential flooding.3) There were large trees and shrubbery to absorb water when the levels begin to rise. For example, I was amazed by the color of the sky. For each of your notable observations, google “factors that affect’ your observation. Describe two factors that affect EACH of

  • Personal Narrative: Mission Trip

    834 Words  | 4 Pages

    There had been a brother and sister who had been caught in the 9 ft flood waters. Donna tells us that some people had found them and tried to pull them in with electrical cords, but the sister was swept away. Her body still hadn’t been found almost a month later. There was also a woman who had lost her husband in the flood. The water was extremely high where she was, and she had been with her husband, who was bedridden and couldn 't walk. The

  • Pinto Case Study: The Ford Motor Company

    1492 Words  | 6 Pages

    A professional engineer should always consider the public’s safety and welfare when performing engineering work. It is imperative for an engineer to be a professional because their work can affect the lives of many people. The Professional Engineers Ontario (PEO) implemented rules to keep the public interest and trust. A document from the PEO states that “… rules are developed in response to the public’s reliance on professional engineers to ensure that the infrastructure, technology and consumer

  • Essay On Hurricane Harvey

    460 Words  | 2 Pages

    The city had so much rainfall that the flood dams over filled and they had to release it no matter what, the citizens couldn 't do anything about it. “Both reservoir outlet gates are open and releasing stormwater into Buffalo Bayou. House flooding is occurring in adjacent neighborhoods, and roadways

  • Exemplification Essay: Flooding In The Trailer Park

    950 Words  | 4 Pages

    If it starts to overflow, we would have to evacuate.” “We new that there was a nearby creek but we did not realize that additional water from the dam also went into the creek. We had never considered the possibility that it could flood. Not until the day Hurricane Agnes hit.” When she went to call Richard she realized the phone was dead. Without any way of getting out of the trailer park in the case they had to evacuate, she went to her neighbor’s house to ask her what she was

  • Cyclone Tracey Essay

    963 Words  | 4 Pages

    Cyclone Tracey – Topic question: Why was Tropical Cyclone Tracey so significant to Australia? Initial Research: Tropical Cyclone Tracey was a small but catastrophic that hit Darwin in 25th of December 1974 and lasted two days. Accounted of 65 lives and destroyed lots of infrastructure and environment. Winds going at a pace of 50km/h and then hitting speeds of at 217km/h. Within 3 weeks, the cyclone lead to 2/3 of the population leaving to find safety. Why have I decided to do Tropical Cyclone

  • Essay On New York City Earthquake

    351 Words  | 2 Pages

    An earthquake is a serious manner in which no one should take lightly. This earthquake was notable for its incongruity: it was one of the most powerful to hit New York City in decades, and yet it caused little damage. The likelihood of an earthquake in the New York metropolitan area has been assessed as ‘‘moderate’’ (Tantala, 2008, p. 812). However, New York City has experienced already three earthquakes and what are going to be the odds for another earthquake happening soon. According to Tantala