Homer Simpson Essays

  • Homer Terror Management Theory And Its Effects On The Simpsons

    834 Words  | 4 Pages

    One of the longest running TV series of all time is the Simpsons. The Simpsons are an animated sitcom that uses satire to depict the “average” American family. The Simpson Family consists of Homer (father), Marge (mother), Bart (Son), Lisa (daughter), and Maggie (baby). The in 2007 did something that they never previously had done. The Simpsons hit the big screen. The major motion picture about Springfield, the home of the Simpsons, and has just about everything possibly imaginable. Springfield

  • The Simpsons: Homer Simpson Byronic Hero

    430 Words  | 2 Pages

    I belief that Homer Simpson could be a Byronic Hero. Throughout the 28 seasons of the Simpsons, we see that Homer is a very selfish and ignorant man, but at the end of the day, there is good in his heart and we want him to prevail whatever may be in his way. A Byronic Hero is a hero that is “so changeable, being… a strange melange of good and evil” (Byron 616). The hero could have many things we hate about the hero, but we will still root for them in the end. This hero is meant to have the reader

  • Homer Simpson Chapter 7 Summary

    633 Words  | 3 Pages

    Within “Thank You for Arguing What Aristotle, Lincoln, and Homer Simpson Can Teach us About the Art of Persuasion,” Jay Heinrichs, a skilled editor, and author with a long history of rhetoric delineates a very educational lesson over the power of persuasive writing or speaking in order to interact with the world around us. He accomplishes this by lucidly describing the steps to become a powerful persuader. My favorite chapter is chapter 7, which proves, to me, that this book should continue to

  • Stereotypes Still Relevant In Today's Society

    700 Words  | 3 Pages

    Stereotype a word that harbours judgements and ideas of how an individual or groups should act depending on factors such as social status, culture, sexual orientation and nationality. It is still used very often in today’s society but most of it consist of ideas that are proved to be false or exaggerated but nonetheless these unrealistic judgements are spread amongst society through propaganda, traditional and social media. In some circumstances, stereotypes can be extreme enough to incite prejudice

  • Lincoln And Homer Simpson Can Teach Us About Persuasion

    257 Words  | 2 Pages

    Thank You for Arguing: What Aristotle, Lincoln, and Homer Simpson Can Teach Us about Persuasion by Jay Heinrichs portray the basics of rhetoric in a modest and clear way. The author initiates the first chapter of his book with a short and simple summary of where rhetoric originated so that the audience can picture the time frame. He points out that it all started back in prehistoric Greece, describes its effect on Roman storytellers, and discusses the importance of rhetoric associated to William

  • Pros And Cons Of Modernism

    819 Words  | 4 Pages

    The English literature was moulded through the epochal seasonings of its tip to toe introspection and contemplation. Each era marks their signature before it leaving behind the cultural, scientific, political innovations and contributions to the sprouting generation. Modernism emerged as a timely necessity which eventually reflected the complexity of urban life superficially but as the rejection of history and substitution of a mythical past. It is also said to be as the product of intellectual crisis

  • How Did The Simpsons Influence Pop Culture

    919 Words  | 4 Pages

    are watching The Simpsons. The Simpsons is an animated classic that has been running for decades. It began with a simple comic about rabbits and has evolved into the well-received primetime show that is known as today. From its popular guest stars, to its never-ending merchandise, The Simpsons is everywhere. Over a quarter of a century, The Simpsons has largely influenced pop culture with its rich and entertaining history. All shows begin with a humble idea, and The Simpsons is no exception

  • The Simpsons, Hyper-Irony Analysis

    784 Words  | 4 Pages

    The article of Carl Matheson, "The Simpsons, Hyper-Irony, and the Meaning of Life", has a profound and detailed discussion about the Quotationalism and Hyper-irony that frequently used in popular animation series The Simpsons. The concept of quotationalism and hyper- irony as interpreting by Carl Matheson means "referring to or quoting other works of popular culture" and "the flavor of humor that is colder and share less sense of humanity"(Carl, para.2). To introduced the ideas of Quatationalism

  • Examples Of Juxtaposition In The Simpsons

    1589 Words  | 7 Pages

    • The Simpsons is a Juxtaposition as for so long they have been the alternative and now they couldn’t be any closer to being mainstream and part of the popular culture – This connects to Bart’s character by showing the progression on ‘The Simpsons’ and how it was the anti-culture just like Bart but as time passes on it is perfectly in line with the mainstream. • Watching with The Simpsons by Jonathon Gray. • “Krusty changes his act to ranting against capitalism. He is soon wooed back to his old ways

  • How Does The Simpsons Affect Society

    447 Words  | 2 Pages

    disappointing society. The Simpsons maintain a middle-class income, they are content with a present situation. Instead of the media creates the perfect American dream. The Simpsons more clearly tell the same working-class audience that they are helping to build a normal standard towards the real socio-economic condition of society. The Simpsons has become a symbol of American life that depicts blue-collar American social reality. Also, as an animated sitcom, The Simpsons not only attracts the young

  • Comparing The Simpsons And Family Guy

    429 Words  | 2 Pages

    From the beginning of their airing, the Simpsons and Family Guy have displayed some similar traits and overall character roles. Both shows revolve around of what is commonly called the “nuclear family” that are cartoons that with each episode are given a situation or issues that they must overcome all while making the viewers laugh with slick humor, pop culture references, and witty remarks. Though both these shows were made all for kicks and giggles how the characters and even the writers handle

  • Examples Of Pity In The Miracle Worker

    720 Words  | 3 Pages

    English Novelist Graham Greene, once said: “Pity is cruel. Pity Destroys”. Pity may seem like a positive thing to have, to feel “sorry” for someone, but in reality, it is not. Pity can make it difficult for people to learn and improve, just like Helen Keller in the play The Miracle Worker, by William Gibson. Helen Keller was a blind and deaf girl, whose family commiserated her for her disabilities. They hired a lady named Anne Sullivan to teach her. Sullivan came to Keller, and luckily, she lacked

  • Gender Stereotypes In Horror Movies: Gender Equality And Sexism In Movies

    727 Words  | 3 Pages

    There is definitely a problem when we talk about gender equality and sexism. It's everywhere: in movies, commercials on television, in music videos, at the workplace and even at school. The gender biases are blatant. One of the sources of the problem lies in the media and the way the media portrays women. For example, the function of an assistant can be fulfilled by both a man and a woman, but when we look at movies and commercials, we often think that it is weird when the assistant of a powerful

  • Mr. Burns Play Analysis

    1000 Words  | 4 Pages

    the play. This is clear and drastic time shift in the future. The characters in the beginning of the play are no longer the characters we see and the costumes make that apparent. The dynamics of third act make it very clear we are now meeting the Simpsons and the drama around their family’s relationship with Mr. Burns. The costumes are very elegant and it shows that the setting for this play is above those of the previous two

  • Doubt A Parable Analysis

    819 Words  | 4 Pages

    Have you ever been in a situation that everything that is happening seems so unsure to you, and you just cannot catch the accurate moment to make an ascertain statement? In the play, Doubt: A Parable by John Patrick Shanley, Sister Aloysius is accusing Father Flynn of having an unhealthy relationship with one of the students in her school. Based on the evidence in Patrick Shanley’s play, Doubt: A Parable, I conclude Father Flynn is guilty because of his actions and words. Firstly, Father Flynn

  • Mother To Son Poem Analysis

    1067 Words  | 5 Pages

    Langston Hughes (1902-1967) was a famous African-American poet, who was born in Missouri and was a part of the Harlem renaissance. He created this famous poem called, 'Mother to son' that was published in 1922 in a dialect form. This poem is about a mother who is giving strong, fierce, and positive advice to her son about life. It connects to not only the mothers who have kids but to the society who fought through hard times to get to where they are at now. In the 'Mother to son' poem, Hughes uses

  • Catcher In The Rye Love Analysis

    1238 Words  | 5 Pages

    In a world filled with contradictions and challenges, the absence of love forces many to attach meaning in anything they can find. The Catcher in the rye is the odyssey of a young boy named Holden Caulfield who faces many challenges, compounded by a childhood that lacked affection and love. Salinger describes Holden’s lifestyle as one that possess many troubles. Throughout the novel it is evident that Holden’s character develops from someone who is detached from the world, to someone who learns to

  • Reflective Analysis Of The Movie 'All In The Family'

    2014 Words  | 9 Pages

    For my reflective analysis, I decided to watch the famous All in The Family series that had aired back in the early 1970’s. This is truly one of the most subversive television series in all of entrainment programming history. Norman Lear, the creator of All in The Family, catered moments to television that were so provocative they would have even made the famous director of Blazing Saddles, Mel Brooks, blush a little. Archie Bunker was a character who harkened back to an older time, A WWII veteran

  • Mad Hot Ballroom Reflection

    1263 Words  | 6 Pages

    Mad Hot Ballroom, directed by Marilyn Agrelo, is a documentary filmed in New York City. Throughout the film, students and faculty of elementary schools teach a ten-week ballroom dancing course in preparation for a city wide competition. Unbenounced to the children, simply by being themselves, they would be teaching their audience a valuable lesson about adolescence, socialization, and institutions. Throughout the film there were a handful of behaviors that one would consider typical for the age

  • Family Guy: Undermining Satire Analysis

    1613 Words  | 7 Pages

    The articles, Family Guy: Undermining Satire by Nick Marx and Fox and Friends: Political Talk by Jeffrey P. Jones, are very different articles, however, they both address how television affects culture. These articles, found in the edited novel of “How To Watch Television,” edited by Ethan Thompson and Jason Mittell, describe how a cartoon, like Family Guy, or a morning talk show, like Fox and Friends, can influence consumers opinions, actions, and how television producers have to keep audiences