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Interrogations Essays

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    interrogators have. The interrogation process has been manipulated over the years and they are using unethical approaches to gain information or a confession from suspects. But in the law of confessions, it is required that confessions are not coerced but be voluntary so that it is admitted into evidence. There are ethical issues that need to be recognized in interrogation which are, the use of false evidence, the use of torture, and deceptive promises. Starting off an interrogation, police will usually

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    suspects or witnesses. Interview and interrogation is a standard training for law enforcement agencies, however, it typically does not cover the developmental deviations between adults and youth, nor does it cover recommended techniques that should be used with youth versus adults. This often leads law enforcement officials to use the same techniques on youth as with adults. Because of this, juveniles are more vulnerable to the pressures of the interrogation, which can cause them to give involuntary

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    sent to jail for crimes they did not commit, because of the intimation they endured during their interrogation. For instance, some people are physically, mentally, and emotionally threatened during interrogations. People are afraid so they often give false confessions or someone else name in an attempt to remove themselves from the situation. However, if psychologist were present during interrogations they would most likely be able to prevent false confessions. Namely, they will be able to tell if

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    False Confessions in Police Interrogations There is much speculation in regard to what occurs during interrogations among law enforcement officials, particularly in instances in which the suspect fails to request the presence of a representative attorney (Beijer, 2010). “The police interrogation is and always will be a critical stage in a criminal procedure” (Beijer, 2010, p. 311). Interrogation results largely determine the next phase of a criminal investigation in regard to the selection of witnesses

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    Interrogation Assignment This documentary showcases a number of police interrogations that are problematic. The one that I believe is the most egregious is the interrogation of twelve year old Thomas Cogdell in the murder of his little sister, Kaylee. His entire interrogation was one big violation of his constitutional rights, not to mention it verged on psychological torture. The first of Cogdell’s constitutional rights to be violated was his 6th Amendment right to counsel. Although he was not

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    2014) In this research paper I will look into the CIA’s Detention and Interrogation program and the remarks of Director Brennan who claims this program was “abhorrent”. To support my conclusion, I will use facts from the report itself, and ethical models I have applied to determine if this program, and its methods were ethical. One of the first finding in the report by the Committee was that the use of the CIA 's enhanced interrogation techniques was not an effective way of gaining truthful information

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    "Enhanced Interrogation" is a term that was introduced by the George W. Bush administration. This type of investigation includes physically forcible interventions, such as waterboarding, sleep deprivation, facial slapping, forced standing for days and so on. Torture has been an argument for a long time to fight terrorism, but it is a bigger issue, especially after the incident of September 11, 2001. And still, it is not over that we should use "Enhanced Interrogation" or not. The techniques that

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    There are many possible reasons, ranging from duress, ignorance when it comes to community laws, and mental impairment. Some individuals also don 't have the mental capacity to understand just what they are admitting to, and the training for interrogations

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    It is unlikely that social consequences of false memories can be avoided. Elizabeth Loftus was intrigued to study false memories, and is perhaps personally responsible for subsequent developments throughout the history of false memories. Some of this history addresses various theories aimed at isolating how or why false memories occur. These include Source Monitoring Framework, Activation Monitoring Theory, Fuzzy Trace Theory, and strategies for persuasion which can lead to the development of false

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    Ella Roger Case Summary

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    computer, police did find numerous threatening emails that were sent from Ella. As a result, Ella was arrested and interrogated. At the end of the interrogation, she confessed to murdering the victim. Nevertheless, Ella later asserted that she did not commit the murder and she made a false confession because of the coercion. Records show that the interrogation almost lasted for 18 hours. Besides, she was neither allowed to rest nor given any food. Ella Roger’s confession was involuntary and the veracity

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    Dictionary waterboarding is “a form of torture in which a person is held facing upwards while water is poured in large quantities over his face. This gives the person the feeling that he is drowning.” “The torture of water” has widely been used as an interrogation technique since the Spanish Inquisition. Several variations of waterboarding can be found in the history of torture, but, all of them are characterized with the same feature – to evoke sensation of drowning leading to suffocation. Waterboarding

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    Teresa Halbach Case

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    It is October 31, 2005. This is the day Teresa Halbach went missing. The disappearance of Teresa Halbach marked the beginning of a long and controversial conviction of both Steven Avery and Brendan Dassey. Although the guilt or innocence of the two is still a hot topic, one must understand the criminal investigation that occurred. Knowing what steps investigators took and how they conducted each method is important to understand because this is what lead investigators to Steven Avery and Brendan

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    Another key factor that is the cause of false confessions is the sociological games that investigators play with a suspect. Moushey insists that Steven Drizin stated that the police interrogation, often tries to confirm the guilt of a suspect rather than figuring out the truth (Moushey). From this, persons are more likely to answer easily to broad questions such as the ones interrogators use to prove the guilt of a suspect, it is also easier

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    influence their behavior. If researchers could pin point the key elements that would be a huge step forward in understanding why juveniles act the way they do. Kelly, Miller, Redlich, Kleinman, and Lamb, in their journal article, “A Taxonomy of Interrogation Methods,” define taxonomy as “the science of classification, organizes what is known about a phenomenon in such a fashion that is accessible and sensible to consumers of the information… it systemizes established observations that

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    to even more than he/she was questioned about. Although these interrogation methods seemed a little like trickery it still is far better than tactics once used such as torture of suspects to make them confess. These methods include psychological as well as physical torture. Some of the psychological methods included blackmailing, exploitation of phobias; e.g., mock execution, leaving suspects in a room full of spiders, interrogations that lasted for an unreasonable

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    countless factors that can contribute to a wrongful conviction, there are five distinct ones that are the leading causes in wrongful convictions: the adversarial process, Eyewitness identification, misconduct and errors regarding forensic evidence, interrogations and confessions, and jailhouse snitches/informants. In relation to wrongful convictions, the adversarial system places more emphasis on the process rather than truth finding, meaning an individual can usually only appeal if there is an issue

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    There are many reasons for an innocent to confess to a crime that she or he hasn 't commit. The most frequent ones are fear of abuse, coercion, ignorance of the law or even fatigue after a long interrogation. Apart from the mentally ill, there is another group that unfortunately is very easy to be manipulated into confessing for something they didn 't do, juveniles. Young children or adolescents are very vulnerable population as they cannot yet understand or analyze efficiently the situation they

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    Utilitarianism On Torture

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    everyone is treated equally under the law (Zinger, 2006, p. 127). Furthermore, though it has been noted that torture through interrogation can produce required information, such as in the ticking time bomb scenario, interrogation often times can produce wrongful admissions of guilt (Neve, 2007, p.117). In an example brought up by scholar Alex Neve, Maher Arar experienced interrogations in both Syria and the United States, which led to intensive torture and abuse in

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    Roxana Saberi was born on the April 26, 1977, in the United States. Her father was Iranian and her mother was Japanese. She was working as an American freelance journalist. After the loss of her press pass, she stayed in Iran to research and to write her book about this country she fell in love with. On the morning of January 31, 2009, she was kidnapped by four strangers and detained in the notorious Evin Prison. Her imprisonment was kept secret from the public because she was accused of being a

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    The Crucible is a 1953 play written by Arthur Miller. It is amplified and somewhat novelized story of the Salem witch trials. Miller wrote the play as a parable to the McCarthyism persecution of communist sympathisers. In this play, a group of Puritan girls are found dancing and conjuring with the devil in the forest. Soon the whole village of Salem knows about the dancing and starts accusing people of witchcraft. Innocent people who are incriminated under improper evidence are hanged. Parallel in

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