James Russell Lowell Essays

  • Wordsworth And Keats Poetry Analysis

    819 Words  | 4 Pages

    Comparison with other poets Wordsworth and John Keats William Wordsworth was a lover of nature and his poems have shows his love about nature. He was used a simple language in his poetry. He has explained true and on his own words to nature of men and nature as they are. Wordsworth was a real supporter of nature in society and nature not gave Wordsworth the matter his poetry was for himself. John Keats poetry was on truth, joys, beauty, life, death and also wrote on nature. When Keats writes about

  • Craft Journey In The Tell Tale Heart

    1143 Words  | 5 Pages

    Teagan Hawes Author’s Craft Essay In life, humanity needs to see past the surface of others, or they will face the pain of guilt later on. In the story, “The Tell Tale Heart” by Edgar Allan Poe, the narrator has an obsession with an old man’s eye--an eye that brought great agony among the narrator whenever he looked upon it. He couldn’t bare seeing that eye any longer, thus, he decided to kill the old man because of it. Feeling great remorse and guilt by the end of the story, the narrator becomes

  • Mental Illness In The Tell Tale Heart

    704 Words  | 3 Pages

    In the short story, “The Tell-Tale Heart” by Edgar Allan Poe, the author writes the story in first person perspective of the main character. The main character acknowledges that he has a disease that allows him to perceive and look at things differently in reality. This mental illness prompts him to want to kill an innocent man because the narrator loathes the old man’s eye. On the eighth night, the main character abruptly kills the old man and confesses to the police because of the panic and pride

  • Disorganized Syntax In Joyce Carol Oates's We Were The Muulvaneys

    774 Words  | 4 Pages

    In an excerpt from her novel We Were the Mulvaneys, Joyce Carol Oates uses disorganized syntax, detailed imagery, and repetition to characterize the speaker, Judd Mulvaney, as a young, curious boy, coming-of-age and suddenly aware of his maturity and of the realities of life. In the excerpt, Oates uses disorganized and unusual syntax to display the enormity of Judd’s revelation, thus alluding to his sudden awareness and depicting him as a young boy shocked by the brevity of life. As Judd comes to

  • Kiss Me Deadly Analysis

    2181 Words  | 9 Pages

    The film follows Mike Hammer, a private investigator who usually deals with divorce cases. Following a series of dramatic events after picking up a beautiful hitchhiker, he begins to seek revenge and solve a case that takes him on an unexpected journey. Along the way we see the story and characters take many twist and turns before it reaches its dramatic, somewhat apocalyptic final conclusion. Robert Aldrich - the director of ‘Kiss Me Deadly’- gives us some interesting compositions and diverse camera

  • The Canterville Chase Character Analysis

    1092 Words  | 5 Pages

    For many years ghosts have existed, and were known to scare man. However, in this story the tables have turned. The Canterville Chase is a short story written by Oscar Wilde in the turn of the 19th Century. The events take place in the Canterville Chase in an English Countryside. There are some primary characters and other secondary characters. Sir Simon de Canterville is considered the main character. He is the Canterville Ghost who has an internal conflict throughout the story. Miss Virginia E

  • Fate And Fate In Melville's Moby Dick

    949 Words  | 4 Pages

    Hegel believes that ، A man's fate is immediately connected with his own being ; it is something which, indeed, he may fight against, but which is really a part of his own life’. (Edward Caird,26,27). Therefore, it is believed that fate may be inevitable or unavoidable as well as divinely inspired. Fate is often associated with negative connotations when compared to destiny. For example, a person who has experienced a misfortune might resign himself to fate. Since he thinks that fate is inevitable

  • Marcia Lieberman's Criticism In Fairy Tales

    1981 Words  | 8 Pages

    Furthermore, in the article, Joosen references, without analyzing the veracity of her claims, Marcia Lieberman, a feminist especially concerned with some of the patriarchal features - supposedly - common in all of the Grimms' tales. Joosen quotes Marcia Lieberman's essay "Some Day My Prince Will Come" emphasizing three of the most relevant points of criticism in fairy tales: "the so-called beauty contest" (132), "the typical constellation of characteristics in fairy-tales women" (132), and "marriage

  • The Journey In Edgar Allan Poe's The Tell Tale Heart

    1131 Words  | 5 Pages

    Teagan Hawes Author’s Craft Essay In life, humanity needs to see past the surface of others, or they will face the pain of guilt later on. In the story, “The Tell Tale Heart” by Edgar Allan Poe, the narrator has an obsession with an old man’s eye--an eye that brought great agony among the narrator whenever he looked upon it. He couldn’t bare seeing that eye any longer, thus, he decided to kill the old man because of it. Feeling great remorse and guilt by the end of the story, the narrator becomes

  • Theme Of Insanity In The Tell Tale Heart

    1096 Words  | 5 Pages

    In Edgar Allan Poe’s tales of criminal insanity, the first-person narrators confess unsound confessions. They control the narrative, and we can only see through their eyes. However, they do describe their own pathological or psychological actions so conscientiously that they exhibit their own insanity. They are usually incapable of stepping back from their narratives to detect their own madness. The narrator 's’ fluency is meticulous and often opulent. It usually implies a revelation as a defense

  • Imagery In The Tell Tale Heart

    905 Words  | 4 Pages

    The deafening thud of a heartbeat fills the air, muffling the cries of help while the old man thrashes underneath the weight of the schizophrenic narrator in "The Tell-Tale Heart" by Edgar Allen Poe. Relief falls upon the murderer-for the old man dies at last. His eye will disturb him no longer. Poe 's utilization of imagery exhibits how the narrator perceives the geriatric man and steers the narrator into a pit of his own demise. The man justifies his perturbing actions to prove himself sane which

  • Compare And Contrast Porphyria's Lover And Goblin Market

    1262 Words  | 6 Pages

    Following the path of the Romantic period of writing, many Victorian era poems hold similar themes or support similar ideas that have evolved from the Romantic period. Porphyria’s Lover by Robert Browning and Christina Rossetti’s, Goblin market are two Victorian era writings that not only have apparent differences, but some similarities as well. Together, these two works can demonstrate some of the themes that ruled the Victorian era and the ways that some authors varied in how they used these themes

  • Madness And Revenge In Hamlet

    1455 Words  | 6 Pages

    In the play, Hamlet, by William Shakespeare, the author claims that revenge and madness are related because the need for revenge can cause one to go insane trying to get their revenge. This comparison comes up when Hamlet kills Polonius, Ophelia goes insane, and when Laertes attempts to do anything to avenge his father and Ophelia. Shakespeare’s claims that madness and revenge are related are not true today because people generally get revenge through the legal system, and rarely have issues as large

  • Raining In Richard Connell's The Most Dangerous Game

    718 Words  | 3 Pages

    John Milton once said, “Every cloud has a silver lining.” In other words, in every dark or gloomy situation, something moral comes with it. In the short story, “The Most Dangerous Game,” by Richard Connell, a hunter named Rainsford falls overboard his yacht after hearing three gunshots. Rainsford swims toward the sound and ends up at an island called ‘Ship-Trap Island’. There, he meets a man named General Zaroff, who would do anything for a good hunt, no matter how cruel. In Ray Bradbury’s, “All

  • Sherlock's Deductions In Sherlock Holmes

    1002 Words  | 5 Pages

    ANALYSIS The first time when we saw Sherlock with his brain in action in the second episode of the first series of “Sherlock” .Sherlock's deductions are at their best when they make us believe that we could do the same thing if we put that in our mind. They are so simple that we could find it realizing that we do the same thing. In this episode Sherlock visits the apartment of a banker called Van Coon. The police believe that he has shot himself but Sherlock is sure enough that he was murdered somehow

  • Literary Analysis: Analysis Of The Tell-Tale Heart

    879 Words  | 4 Pages

    Analysis of The Tell-Tale Heart “The Tell-Tale Heart” short story written by Edgar Allan Poe, the narrator which is the murder in the story is trying to convince the audience that he is not insane. He has been ill, but insists that his illness has made his mind, feeling, and senses even stronger. The narrator wants to kill the old man that he lives with only because he finds that his eye is evil and compares his eye to a vulture. “And every morning I went to his room, and with a warm, friendly

  • Edgar Allan Poe's Tales Of The Criminal Insanity Analysis

    1395 Words  | 6 Pages

    In Edgar Allan Poe’s tales of criminal insanity, the first-person narrators confess unsound confessions. They control the narrative, which only allows us to see through their eyes. However, they do describe their own pathological or psychological actions so conscientiously that they exhibit their own insanity. They are usually incapable of stepping back from their narratives to detect their own madness. The narrator 's’ fluency is meticulous and often opulent. It usually implies a revelation as a

  • The Jade Peony Analysis

    1237 Words  | 5 Pages

    It is a custom in the Chinese culture for some families to hang a wind chime in honor of their loved ones on the day that they pass. This is what the fictional character, Sek-Lung’s, father did in the short story, “The Jade Peony” written by Wayson Choy. Choy, being born a Canadian of Chinese descent, highlighted the struggle of living in between two drastically different, and distinguished cultures through Sek-Lung. The seven year old boy narrates his everyday adventures with his Grandmama. She

  • Cirque Du Freak Character Analysis

    1001 Words  | 5 Pages

    Cirque Du Freak A Living Nightmare by Darren Shan is about two best friends, Darren Shan and Steve Leonard, and how they get tickets to see the freak show Cirque Du Freak, a freak show that features unordinary performers such as the snake-boy, the twisting twins, the wolf-man, Larten Crepsley, and his spider, Madam Octa. They each get into some trouble when Steve finds out a secret and Darren steals something he shouldn’t have. The book is fiction, but Darren says, in the introduction, that everything

  • Cool Air Lovecraft Analysis

    729 Words  | 3 Pages

    Waiting on every exhausting whim of an 18 year old preserved corpse sounds absurd and impossible, but for H.P. Lovecraft’s first person narrator in “Cool Air” it is a shocking reality. The strategic application of first person point of view keeps the reader on edge with a limited view. Any other point of view would reveal too much information on the pivotal Doctor Muñoz, and not allow access to the narrator's thoughts and emotions. First person point of view in H.P. Lovecraft’s “Cool Air” connects