Jane Eyre Essays

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    Charlotte Bronte knew as one of the most talented women authors of the Victorian era. She and her sisters, Emily and Anne grow up in Victorian England, they were inspired by the Romantic authors, and all of them write masterpieces in English literature. Charlotte Bronte faced a lot of difficulties, and obstacles in her life even though she manages to write important works in English Literature. For example, Jane Eyre, The Professor, Shirley, and Villette. At first, she writes Jane Eyre under pseudonym Currer Bell.

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    The titular Jane in Jane Eyre struggles to free herself from the power of others to achieve independence throughout the course of the book. As a child, she fights against unjust authority figures, and as an adult, she spurs multiple unequal marriage proposals. Bronte, through Jane asserts that a woman should be independent from others. When Jane was young, she tried to free and defend herself from unjust authority figures. When Jane 's aunt unfairly confines Jane to the Red Room, Jane launches into a verbal diatribe against her aunt.

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    Class Is presented from the beginning you are born till the end. During the period of your life you can either change your social class or stay the same as society defines you. Jane Eyre is a english novel that explores social class that hold no boundaries that could be crossed. Charlotte Bronte focuses on status flexibility and how Jane the protagonist in the story deals with other characters and evaluates their personalities and how the economic shifts have changed them for the better or for the worst. Poverty looked down upon, but is as degrading as being wealthy.

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    My Summer Project is on the novel Jane Eyre written by Charlotte Bronte. My project initially highlights the problems faced by a women in 19th Century. The issues come in the way of people when the two belongs to different class and status. It also highlights various themes, the writer has used in the novel and also how every theme is being shown with examples. The novel is about love and determination, which can be understood from the view of an orphaned girl, who apart from being a part of all the difficulties and problems of class and status, she always believed in love and was determined by it.

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    In what ways do Charlotte Bronte’s novel Jane Eyre fit the Victorian era? Throughout the novel many elements of the book relates back to the following ways of the Romantic period. Jane Eyre shows characteristics of Romanticism. Jane Eyre expertly fits the Romantic period due to Charlotte Bronte’s use of individualism, the supernatural, and emotions and inner thoughts throughout Jane Eyre.

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    Jane Eyre and The Odyssey both present characters that go on a journey in their life. Jane Eyre has a journey toward what she wants in life, and Odysseus is trying to get back to his family. Despite the differences of the characters, they both show self-lessness and care for others. Jane Eyre and Odysseus had many hard times, including rough childhoods and even monsters of the Greek world. Although Jane Eyre and Odysseus journey for different reasons, they both are independent and self-less when they face struggles that occur on their journeys.

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    Thornfield was a completely different world for Jane. It was a major change physically and socially, as a governess she had more opportunities and duties to fulfill. Jane was not intimidated by what was expected of her, yet she was excited to see what the future at Thornfield had in store for her. The power of love was unavoidable for Jane, “The claims of her former love prove stronger than her sense of duty to that honorable but emotionally shallow Rivers” (Moss 3).

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    The heroines of Jane Eyre and Fanny Price can be contrasted as the individual persons in relation to the British society. Both novels were written as the works of the different literary movements and thus both authors approached their characters from the different angles. These literary movements – Neoclassicism and Romanticism – represent the contrary attitudes of the society towards an individual. Jane Austen as an authoress of the Neoclassical movement reflects some of its attitudes.

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    It’s safe to assume that you have never looked to a fictional character for relationship advice, or any advice at all for that matter. However, I’ve recently discovered to a highly mature young woman who is wise beyond her years. No, she is not a real person, but she lives on the pages of a Charlotte Brontë novel. Her name is Jane Eyre, and to say that she has been through a lot would be quite an understatement. Jane has dealt with more than her fair share of traumatizing, and in some cases, odd experiences, including antagonistic relatives, deaths, unsolicited marriage proposals from long lost cousins, and fires.

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    Jane Eyre is set during the Victorian period, back when a women 's role in society was determined by class, and also indicated what was socially correct for a woman to do. A job as a governess was one of the only few respectable jobs available to the poor yet well educated women who were not able to get married. Jane Eyre does not only narrates a girls life experience, but it also emphazises the social injustices of the time, such as poverty, lack of education and inequality between the sexes. Jane 's economic status is particularly noted at the beginning of the novel.

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    In her gothic novel Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte tells a story of a young, poor orphan who is raised by her bitter aunt, Mrs. Reed, along with abusive cousins and maids. After years of repulsive treatment, Jane attends a strict all-girls school, Lowood, and embarks a teaching profession at Thornfield, which fits her ambitions of putting her competent skills to work. Jane holds an ambiguous role in society while undergoing a journey of trials and challenges against feminism, deceit, and rejection. However, Jane pulls through with fortitude, recognizing that her moral intuition and self-worth are much more valuable than the opinions of others. Bronte expresses Jane’s obstinate view of feminism by revealing her dismay against the inferior treatment

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    In the novel Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte, the protagonist, Jane, battles societal expectations and gender roles throughout her life. Her strong-willed personality clashes with the rules of being a woman and thus she is criticized frequently. Janes battle between her individuality and judgment of others is apparent and established persistently within the novel. Furthermore, these internal quarrels within Jane establish the meaning of Bronte 's work through gender roles and societal expectations.

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    Essay 1 summary – mind control Essay one, “From the red room to Rochester’s haircut: mind control in Jane Eyre.” , by Judith Leggatt and Christopher Parkes, is an essay analyzing the book “Jane Eyre” and the different aspects of control within it. The main idea of the essay is how “the control of the imagination is at stake”. Jane Eyre’s imagination is indeed in jeopardy because some of the people in her life take away her freedoms and turn her into a servant.

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    Maturation In Jane Eyre

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    Children, and young people, in general, are often seen as inferior because they have not had as much experience as those of an older age. That being said, it is common knowledge that as our age increases, we learn more and grow to be stronger individuals. This maturation is not necessarily all due to age and knowledge, though, but also is influenced by the person themselves, and what they allow. In the beloved novel Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Brontë, human development is highlighted as the reader travels with Jane through her struggles and growth. Jane’s maturation throughout the novel is evident as she migrates to different environments throughout her life, from Gateshead to Lowood, to Thornfield, due to her constant struggle against the cage she is trapped in by outside sources, and herself.

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    Rochester 's Redemption: The Taming of the Byronic Hero "Reader, I married him." (Brontë, p. 444). Jane 's triumphant declaration at the end of Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë is a hard-earned resolution to Jane 's year-long decision to leave Mr. Rochester to uphold her moral convictions rather than remain as his submissive mistress in bigamy. Yet, not much attention is paid to Mr. Rochester 's evolution in this time, and we only see him as a dramatically reformed man at the end of the novel. Although Mr. Rochester 's role in the novel is perhaps subsidiary to Jane 's insofar as signposting her development throughout her time at Thornfield and beyond, it is arguable that he had to undergo a process of redemption of his own so that Jane could

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    Jane Eyre, after reflecting on the past eight years she has spent at Lowood, is eager to start a new chapter in her life outside of where she has grown up. After staring at the beautiful horizon of mountains from her window, Jane recognizes how much there is for her in the world. Her unfortunate upbringing, combined with difficulties such as the death of Helen Burns, Mr. Brocklehurst's negligent care of the Lowood girls, and the departure of Miss Temple, leave Jane longing for a livelier, happier lifestyle. In this passage, Jane exclaims, "I desired liberty; for liberty I gasped; for liberty I uttered a prayer," as a result of her ongoing feelings of imprisonment. Originally, Jane was trapped under the rule of Mrs. Reed at Gateshead, resulting in melancholy and anger that caused her to act out.

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    In the novel Jane Eyre Charlotte Bronte presents two opposite characteristic of fire where the fire can destroy and also provide warmth. Throughout Jane Eyre Bronte uses fire’s warmth to represent love and redemption while fire’s destruction bring the downfall of the character. The use of fire in the novel connects to the theme of the book in that Bronte demonstrates to the audience that people must find a balance between independence, passion, and also society’s norms in order to thrive in a society. Through the symbol of fire, Bronte presents Jane and Rochester’s progress toward finding balance throughout the novel.

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    Although there are a lot of differences between these novels, the characters Jane Fairfax and Jane Eyre have a lot in common. First of all, both are orphans trying to manage their lives on their own. As orphans, they are more independent than others, as Adrienne Rich puts it: “mothers are dependent and powerless themselves and can only teach their daughters how to survive by the same means: marriage to a financially secure male.” (Thaden 63) Motherless children, on the other hand, had to find a way on their own to survive in this world. Their Childhood

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    A hero with a wild side is commonly known as a Byronic hero that entrances the protagonist. In the novel, Jane Eyre (1847), Charlotte Bronte suggests that Mr. Rochester is the Byronic hero by featuring his rejection of societal norms and unnamed sexual crime. The author’s purpose is to add a mysterious element to the tragic life of Jane Eyre in order to intensify the conflicts. Although Edward Rochester displays characteristics of a Byronic hero, his lack of self-respect and confidence differentiate him. After experiencing some obstacles in his life that lead him to lose his status, he was not able to fully recover after he got Jane Eyre back.

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    Coming Of Age Narratives: Essay 1 2. Examine how the text represents gender. Are these representations problematic or contradictory? How do they relate to the plot and structure of the novel?

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