Ludwig von Bertalanffy Essays

  • Family Systems Theory: The Jarvis Family Case

    1176 Words  | 5 Pages

    This case came to Child Welfare Services upon referral from Ms. Partridge, elementary school nurse, and Ms. Caprilano, school principal. After a home visit, a psychological assessment, a follow up interview, and finally a thorough police investigation, it had been determined that the two young Jarvis girls, Marie, age eight, and Joanne, age seven, were sexually abused by their father. Furthermore, Marie reported abuse began around three years of age and was repeatedly told by her father that it

  • Cultural Awareness Reflection

    1269 Words  | 6 Pages

    1. Summary of Issue My cultural background causes me to be curious about cultural competence, and as a future social worker, I think it is important that I am able to understand what it means. With the never-ending string of racially charged violence, protests against the governement, and all other actions carried out my disadvantaged groups, it has caused me to look at myself and the concept of white privlage that I have. I have always known I was not well-rehearsed in the understanding of other

  • Poverty Effects Of Risk Families Essay

    999 Words  | 4 Pages

    HOW POVERTY AFFECTS RISK FAMILIES There are several ways in which poverty affect the lives of risk families. In addition to been stigmatized, poverty affect the way these subset of people feed; acquire education, their cognitive and behavioral abilities. 1.2 IMPACT OF POVERTY ON PRODUCTIVITY The family productivity can be described as the quality of life associated with the members which contributes to their daily activities making it enjoyable and useful. There are several indicator of the productivity

  • Florence Nightingale Leadership Style

    1728 Words  | 7 Pages

    -------- I attribute my success to this – I never gave or took any excuse. --------- Florence Nightingale The Leadership of Florence Nightingale and the Legacy She Made for Modern Nursing During the 19th century, things were different than they are today. People, culture, technology, and jobs have all changed dramatically. Florence Nightingale was one person that helped make some of these societal changes. In Nightingale’s time, there were a lot of sociopolitical constraints against women

  • John Maynard Keynes's Economic Policies

    2257 Words  | 10 Pages

    John Maynard Keynes was born on the 5th of June 1883 in Cambridge, England. He was the eldest of 3 children who were born into an Upper middle class family. John Neville Keynes, his father, was an economist and a lecturer in Moral Science at The University of Cambridge. John Maynard Keynes is widely known as the father of modern macroeconomics due to his ideas that revolutionized macroeconomics during the 1930s. He was a policy-oriented economist who concentrated on the economic policy of the Government

  • Liberalism Vs Liberal Democracy Essay

    1502 Words  | 7 Pages

    While both liberalism and democracy are two political concepts that are capable of standing alone, they are also able to stand together in the form of a liberal democracy. In today’s politics there are two forms of liberalism that have been established; classical liberalism (or neo-liberalism) and modern liberalism, and while liberalism is known for being concerned mainly with “the individual” and self-ruling and democracy mainly with majority rule - the two are seen to compliment each other in

  • Capitalism In Singapore Essay

    1332 Words  | 6 Pages

    Capitalism is built on the existence of private firms, where in Karl Marx’s opinion, the income generated is a result of the exploitation of workers. In private firms, workers do not own factors of production and Marx believed that this would inevitably lead to the alienation of workers from their environment and themselves. Unlike in traditional societies, where workers gain satisfaction from creating products of their own chosen specialized fields, in the current context, workers see their work

  • Thomas Nagel: The Mind-Body Problem

    1361 Words  | 6 Pages

    This essay looks at Thomas Nagel’s account of the problem of consciousness i.e., the mind-body problem. I compare both Nagel’s and Colin McGinn's arguments regarding consciousness. Nagel’s argument introduces us to the intractability of the mind-body problem. The focus for Nagel is not to highlight the distinction between mind and body. Nagel employs one to not be so focused on the problem, rather embrace the possibilities regarding the phenomenology of consciousness. However, this should not deter

  • Kant's Emptiness Charge Analysis

    3638 Words  | 15 Pages

    The Emptiness Charge in Kant’s Moral Philosophy Introduction: The Emptiness Charge in Kant’s Moral Philosophy Chapter One: The Formalistic Expressions in Kant’s Writings 1.1. The Groundwork of Metaphysics of Morals- The Equivalence Thesis 1.2. The Critique of Practical Reason- The Universal Will Chapter Two: Kant’s Formalism and Its Emptiness Charge 2.1. Hegel’s Empty Formalism Objection 2.1.1. A Restatement of Categorical Imperative 2.1.2. The Limited Interpretation of Hegel’s Emptiness Charge 2

  • Compare And Contrast Egypt And The Holy Roman Empire

    1037 Words  | 5 Pages

    The Holy Roman Empire consisted of multi-ethnic territories during the early medieval periods until its collapse in 1806 after the Napoleonic wars. The territories in the Holy Roman Empire included the Kingdom of Germany, Italy, Burgundy as well as other numerous small kingdoms. The Holy Roman Empire was centrally located in Europe and mainly occupied the present day Germany. Ancient Egypt was an old civilization found in the Northeastern Africa. The Ancient Egypt occupied the present country of

  • Analysis Of John Stuart Mill's Harm Principle

    1598 Words  | 7 Pages

    Whereas John Stuart Mill’s Harm Principle proffers a judicious moral schema for the regulation of societal intervention regarding individual liberty, it fails as an unequivocal method of establishing the limits of political authority within a civilised society. The aforementioned principle dictates “the sole end for which mankind are warranted, individually or collectively, in interfering with the liberty of action of any of their number, is self-protection”. This principle advocates strongly for

  • Justified Quotes In Fahrenheit 451

    972 Words  | 4 Pages

    Even though, we know what is right from wrong in our century, in the book Fahrenheit 451, where the author Ray Bradbury kind of predicts what our lives we're going to be like. He foreshadowed what our society was going to be like. Also the technological advances that we would have. In this book towards the world starts to fall apart for the main character Montag. His fire chief makes him burn his own house down for having illegal books. He is justified in killing his fire chief and running from the

  • Masculinity In A Streetcar Named Desire

    1028 Words  | 5 Pages

    Strength, lack of emotion, aggression, and confidence are some of the traits society has assigned to men. The play A Streetcar Named Desire uses its lead character to support and portray these traits. The play takes place in the late 1940’s, a time when men and masculinity played a significant role in both households and society. Stanley Kowalski, the leading male, displays the timely masculine qualities while also showing what affect masculinity can have on those around him. Stanley is strong willed

  • Breakfast At Tiffany's Critical Analysis

    833 Words  | 4 Pages

    Breakfast at Tiffany’s, by Truman Capote, is a novel in the perspective of an unnamed narrator. The story begins when the narrator moves into a new apartment building, and befriends our main character: Holly Golightly. Holly, being about 18 or 19 years old, is described as a beautiful woman who essentially makes her money as a call girl. Our narrator, soon referred to by Holly as “Fred” due to his likeness or her brother, is a writer. “Fred”, grows closer with Holly, meeting her manager as well

  • Critical Analysis Of My Papa's Waltz By Theodore Roethke

    734 Words  | 3 Pages

    The text I am going to be analyzing is ‘My Papa’s Waltz’, a poem written by Theodore Roethke. The poem was written in 1942. The poem discusses a domestic situation of a little boy describing the behaviour and characteristics of his parents, especially his father. Roethke had a difficult relationship with his father, who died when he was fifteen, and the poem reflects that. The themes of the poem are family and admiration. The poem targets a broad audience, but is specifically interesting to those

  • Loyalty In Beowulf: The Epic Beliefs Of The Anglo-Saxon Culture

    812 Words  | 4 Pages

    Throughout the text of Beowulf, the Anglo-Saxons translated their beliefs when they passed this epic tale generation to generation. Loyalty existed as one of the strongest beliefs of the Anglo-Saxons. They believed that loyalty to the authority would lead normal people to greatness and rewards. Another belief expressed in Beowulf was the establishment of the epic hero. These heroes could do more than regular men could, as they defined themselves as strong, loyal, and well known people. While honoring

  • F Scott Fitzgerald Crack Up Analysis

    1440 Words  | 6 Pages

    No matter who and where people are, they face hardships and struggle for getting better in this or that situation. Writers try to cope with their scuffles by writing. Writing is one way of pain relief and also connection with those who keep up with them and their work. One of such writers was F. Scott Fitzgerald who wrote the collection of essays; the Crack-up that mainly gives the impression of being a monologue starving to be a dialogue. The author used the technique of simply addressing his ideas

  • Machiavelli's The Prince Analysis

    900 Words  | 4 Pages

    An analysis of Machiavelli’s The Prince showcases the importance of war, and Shakespeare’s Henry V personifies Machiavelli’s views. Machiavelli encourages rulers to “aim at conquering and maintaining the state,” and war is the prince’s tool to use (The Prince, 66). War is justifiable but only when necessity compels the prince. Shakespeare’s King Henry epitomizes Machiavelli’s ideas. Henry manipulates the law and promotes his self-interests, asserting that he conquers France in defense of England

  • Dynamic Character In Ernest Hemingway's A Farewell To Arms

    724 Words  | 3 Pages

    A Farewell to Arms delves into the world of Frederic Henry and the affairs and difficulties he has to deal with as an ambulance driver for the Italian Army in World War One. We find ourselves scrounging over the details trying to figure out exactly who Frederic Henry is and what makes him, him. Henry, although he may seem static, is very much a dynamic character due to his journey of self discovery where he learns of love, emotion, and religion. Henry begins his journey in Italy as an ambulance

  • Wild Apples Thoreau Analysis

    923 Words  | 4 Pages

    “Men have become the tools of their tools.” -Henry David Thoreau Henry David Thoreau displayed his disapproval and rejection for the ideas of the industrial revolution through his essays by stating that nature was lost by the usage of technology and the industrial revolution caused humans to lose their self identity; this led Thoreau to believe that people had to go back to nature for purification. During Thoreau’s lifetime, he saw many technological advancements, which he believed to be detrimental