Mira Nair Essays

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Mira Nair Essays

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    Mississippi Masala Essay

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    The movie “Mississippi Masala” directed by Mira Nair, is a heartwarming yet powerful film that reveals a side to racism, separation, and oppression that many may be unaware of. In a specific scene in the movie, the main character Mina attends a small gathering at the home of her romantic interest, Demetrius. Demetrius’ cousin Tyrone finds Mina to be appealing and delivers his best form of a pick-up line: “You think if I go to India and get me one of those Aladdin lamps, rub it real good, you think

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    Nothing reminds you of how far you are from home more than giving birth to a child in a foreign, distant land. As Jhumpa Lahiri describes in her novel, The Namesake, being a foreigner is like a life-long pregnancy, a perpetual wait, a constant burden, an ongoing responsibility, and a continuous feeling out of sorts. Throughout the novel, Lahiri accounts the story of a couple moving from India to America, as well as, the complex process of raising kids in an unknown country, without family, without

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    The Reluctant Fundamentalist Argumentative Paper The Reluctant Fundamentalist is a novel that looks into the life of Changez, a young Pakistani man, that came to the United States to receive a college education from Princeton University. Changez later lives in New York City and has a very well paid job at a business evaluation firm. With the terrorist attacks of 9/11, Changez goes through many physical and emotional hardships before eventually returning to his home country. Throughout this novel

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    There are some different types of identity in the society. People can maintain the identity as a member of a community such as a country or religion, and the identity as an individual, or personality. Thus, the theme of identity can be argued in some ways. For example, “First Muse,” the poem written by Julia Alvarez is about the Mexican-American girl who faces the problem to have her identity as an American. The Catcher in the Rye, the novel written by J. D. Salinger, is also based on the process

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    Part of growing up is leaving your parents and determining what is best for yourself instead of listening to what others think is best for you. In both Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse and the movie Dead Poets Society we were introduced to characters who were beginning to make these steps in life; Siddhartha himself, and Neil Perry. While each character had many differences, they both faced the same problem, their fathers had set out a plan for their lives that they would follow no matter what was for

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    Asian American Culture

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    In the beginning of the school year, I defined an Asian American as American that participates in Asian culture. As I read “The Namesake” by Jhumpa Lahiri, I always questioned Gogol’s identity. Even though he’s the son of first generation Americans that come from Asia, he often tries to run away from his heritage . So, would Gogol be considered Asian American? During his adulthood, from his breakups to the death of his father, Gogol matures mentally. He begins to regret resenting his trip to Calcutta

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    Introduction: My essay will examine Surrealism and how it influences early and modern film. Surrealism is a cultural movement that originated in the early 1920s. André Breton expressed Surrealism as "psychic automatism in its pure state, by which one proposes to express - verbally, by means of the written word, or in any other manner - the actual functioning of thought." Surrealism is founded by Andre Breton in 1924 and was a primarily European movement that fascinated many members of the Dada movement

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    The film Monsoon Wedding (2001) directed by Mira Nair has been my favorite film so far. What makes the film so interesting to me is that Mira Nair put her own twist on the film by mixing an expected traditional Indian Bollywood film and adding modern Hollywood styles to the film. After doing research on Mira Nair and the film for my presentation, I can see why this is incorporated in the film since she spent time here in the United States studying acting and film at one of the top ivy league university’s

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    Monsoon Wedding Essay

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    traditional culture to a modern, westernized one. With this shift, many Non-Resident Indians (NRIs) struggle to create a balance between what they have been taught and what they are learning through globalization. In the film Monsoon Wedding, directed by Mira Nair, an Indian family in New Delhi is a perfect model for a globalized India and the tensions it brings to family life. While the family lives all around the world, those who reside in westernized countries seem to embrace the contemporary culture, some

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    ABSTRACT ' 'We are like that only ' '-runs the subtitle of a popular production of Mira Nair, representing Indians today. Released in 2001, Monsoon Wedding is Nair 's ' 'love song to my home city". Through a reworking of the tropes of Bollywood cinema, a medium that connects the global audience, Nair 's film depicts the enthusiasm coupled with certain darker shades, more so in the midst of a wedding, of a Punjabi middle class family in contemporary India. Set in the metropolitan

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    Love, Trust, and Family Renowned film critic Roger Ebert has praised Mira Nair’s Monsoon Wedding for the way that it “leaps national boundaries and celebrates universal human nature.” Indeed, despite the many differences that seem to divide people, there are also aspects of life that are present in the lives of everyone that can be used to relate and understand those with a different background. Throughout the story, the creators allow their audience to relate to a traditional Indian family through

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    The Namesake Movie Essay

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    In Mira Nair’s, The Namesake, Nair sheds light on American immigrants and the internal tug-of-war between one’s ethnic identity and cultural assimilation. Narratively full of layers, this film uses cinematic techniques to exemplify global flows such as Appadurai’s ethnoscapes and ideoscapes to develop its implicit plot. In the case of the character, Gogol, he struggles to separate humble his Bengali roots from his more secular life as a second generation American. In this film, Nair uses a literary

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    Jhumpa Lahiri's Namesake

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    Namesake: By Jhumpa Lahiri(A comparative analysis of film and novel) From the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of another fabulous novel written “Interpreter of Maladies”, Jhumpa Laheri’s critically appraised first novel is a finely wrote, deeply moving Moving family drama that highlights the significant themes: the immigrant experience, the Clash of cultures, the forced and conflicted tie between generations. The storyline of namesake takes the Ganguli family from their tradition- bounded life in

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    Women who strive against themselves, at war with the seeming redundancy of two X chromosomes, in a competition we were never made for and, in our hearts, don’t really want to win. While sex and everything connected to its pleasure is seen as taboo in Indian society, female sexuality is viewed to be even more problematic. Perhaps because Indian society still sees a woman’s identity to be ultimately domestic, in which the equation of carnal pleasures don’t quite fit in. Even if they do, voicing those

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    Universal Pain and the demonization of the other. Much like Babel, the film Crash presents characters with seemingly separate lives but end up being linked in some way. This intersection is an attempt to demonstrate how people can be separated by many things but are united by pain. The title Babel is an allusion to the Biblical story of how God made people start speaking different languages so that they would not be able to continue building a tower so tall that they would consider themselves greater

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