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Music genres Essays

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    My Favorite Song

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    In addition, what this song means to me also influenced my decision. Not only do I love the song’s classy and jazzy rhythm, and Frank Sinatra’s beautiful and bold voice, but also the lyrics are the reason for much of my affection to the

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    This theory is shown by rhythmic structure and shaping of pieces. Typically, the pieces before did not have complex rhythmic structure or tonality to the pieces played. This changed in the baroque period due to the addition of actual instrumentation structure to pieces. During this period, the violin and trumpet gain massive popularity as well as the harpsichord. The major theoretical advancement in the baroque era was the introduction of a strict “melody and harmony”.

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    The name of this era was perfect to represent this season of music. The rebirth of music was evident as secular music became prominent, reflecting its cultural backdrop of humanism. During the Renaissance, vocal music was viewed as more important than instrumental music. Accordingly, much of the music had a smooth, imitative, polyphonic texture with four to six voice parts of nearly equal voice parts.

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    Since his popularity on Broadway, other similar writers follow his example, but throughout Stephen Sondheim’s canon of musical theatre lyrics, he alters the requirements for musical

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    It was very good experience to learn about him, and how he loves people and listen to them. Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson is the first musical play I've gone to. I thought it wouldn’t be very good, but when I saw it I liked it. There are some factors made the play successful which are the music, the stage, and the actors. Music and the songs played important roles in the play.

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    They were playing their parts as they were singing even if they were playing in the East Wing than on a stage. Through their performance they were enjoying singing and made the music more interesting than a boring history lesson. You could tell they were enthusiastic through the energy shown through their performance. The vocals were dynamic and when the cast was singing louder it was easier to identify the important messages. By rapping louder, Miranda says “ I’m not throwing away my shot” he uses hand gestures showing that he is taking a stand playing his part as Alexander Hamilton.

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    Among the many successful things Aaron Copland has done for music, he has also written an eloquent description for the three separate musical planes. He begins by explaining that the simplest way to listen to music is “for the sheer pleasure of the musical sound itself” (Copland, 7). This feeling of listening to music for pleasure is it’s own plane. It is known as the sensuous plane, and Copland believes that this form of listening is “an important one in music, a very important one, but it does not constitute the whole story” (Copland, 8). It seems that Copland believed the reader could understand this concept on a personal level, so he chose not to elaborate on this plane.

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    Some people who perfected this were Duke Ellington, John Coltrane, and Chick Webb. In many instances, Duke Ellington had many hit songs that really pushed the Harlem Renaissance along with the tone and sensation that it would provide to the listener. One of these songs, In a Sentimental Mood, really showcases his technique and style of music and how it attaches to people's mood. The tone of In a Sentimental Mood expresses the baffling times of pain and depressing ambiance. Another musician, who could do this was John Coltrane, with his reverent music and flair that really drove the point of inequality and the necessity of equality to those of every race.

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    Nene Moj Analysis

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    If handled with care, I do not see reason to have any. True, we cannot control the quality of the output, but we do control what we decide to listen to and why. Moreover, the benefits are many: First, we have the ability to enhance the melody and accurately represent the emotion of the lyrics. This will aid in the creation of more accurate image schema of the entire song, eventually inducing a stronger affect to the reader. Consequently, narratives of traditional songs, which depict historical struggles of a nation, are now perceived more vividly than they ever have through music.

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    Radio became a product of the mass-market. Manufacturers were overwhelmed by the demand for radios because customers stood in line to get their radios from them or shops are in the United States. Families would usually gather around their radios for their nighttime entertainment and they would listen to either music or announcements through the radio. Radio started broadcasting popular music classical music sporting events weather reports market updates and politics. Electronic music was used for performances that were developed at the end of the 19th century in shortly after word people explored sounds that are not been considered musical.

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    What is Polyphony? Polyphony is the texture of music containing two or more individual lines of melody, rather than one monotonous line of melody. This was brought later into the middle ages after monophony and later developed into homophony. Monophony is the musical texture with only one voice, Polyphony is the musical texture containing 2 or more individual melodies played simultaneously and Homophony is the musical texture of the melody accompanies with chords. Figure 1.1- Polyphony Figure 1.2- Monophony Figure 1.3- Homophony Origin

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    When musicians engage in collective improvisation, they usually have some sort of frame of reference from which to base their playing off of. In jazz slang, this frame of reference is known as a “standard”. In popular music it is typically uncommon to have one song played and recorded by countless bands and for each recording to be unique in its own way, but somehow jazz musicians find a way to play the same song again and again, for decades. Take for example, the popular jazz standard “Autumn Leaves”. Ever since the year of its composition in 1945, jazz musicians have been playing and recording covers of this iconic piece.

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    He made it so popular and universal that it passes through the years and the fashions until now without us figuring out. Scat singing is a vocal jazz style that consists of improvising a song made of senseless syllables or wordless vocables. Also, it follows a tune (improvised or not), usually over an instrumental background. All these elements turn scat singing into a very difficult technique.

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    • Scott Joplin bought jazz into homes all over the country, and the Ragtime craze was on. It really caught on in New Orleans allowing Jazz to flourish due to its less rigid social backgrounds. New Orleans became the first true jazz centre. • This encouraged the popularity and growth of jazz music. • Jazz went from only playing in New Orleans to becoming a staple of the America airwaves, dance halls and homes” • The 1930’s brought a new style of jazz “big band swing”.

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    Music Essay Aaliya Shafi 7B Jazz Rock 21/1/2017 Jazz-rock may be known as the loudest, wildest bands from jazz camp. This is also known as Jazz-fusion as a musical genre, which was developed, in the late 19’60s and the early 19’70s. This was when artists merged different characteristics of Jazz harmony, and improvisation with styles such as: rock, funk, blues and Latin Jazz.

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    After being featured on multiple records for many different bands Armstrong was offered a chance to be recorded with a band under his own name (biography.com). Armstrong’s new spotlight grew his popularity in large strides. His personal style of playing and ability to make jazz a solo friendly music became the people's new favorite type of jazz. He put out many records and his popularity grew even in outside countries. Armstrong also was the beginning of the popularity of “scat” singing (Biography.com).

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    Neoclassic composers focussed their attention on balance ,clarity and emotional restraint. The attention shift came after the Romantic era where music was heavily emotionally influenced and has little or no form. Elements which were prominent in the 20th century were contrapuntal texture, expanded tonal harmony and an emphasis on rhythm. The Romantic era focussed on programme music whereas the 20th century used absolute music more. Neoclassic composers drew inspiration from the Baroque and Classical eras.

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    Bach 's Brandenburg Concerto also uses the the Concerto Grosso format where there is a contrast between the ripieno full orchestra parts, and the concertino soloist parts. In the concertino parts of Bach’s piece, it is marked obligato which means that the piece must be played exactly as written, which contrasts with the ideas of jazz music. During the ripieno parts however, the figured bass is provided in the continuo which allows for improvisation. One last secondary link that I have found is that is a vital part of the form and and aids the style of each culture as well.

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    It was during this time that many jazz musicians began to experiment with electric instruments and amplified sound as well as electronic effects and synthesizers. These instruments were common in other forms of popular music yet unprecedented in jazz. Many of the developments during the late 1960s and early 1970s have since become established elements of jazz fusion musical practice, perhaps the longest lasting stylistic showcase of jazz music due to its flexibility as a term. The development of American jazz is staggering and a fascinating study, but the music’s influence also transcends borders. On the tropical beaches of Rio de Janeiro in the late 1950s, students, artists and musicians came together to create a new sound called Bossa Nova.

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    If we compare his music to the composers from the Baroque, Classical or even the Romantic era, we can find one very important difference: the music of Steve Reich is a state, while the music of Beethoven, for example, is a process. With that idea in mind, I believe that even though music is an art of time and organizing pitches or notes, Steve Reich gave time a significant role in his pieces. Time was an extremely important factor in his music, which separated him from other musicians. Another interesting aspect of his creation is giving the spoken word or poetry a lot of attention while writing the music, and by that we can also consider him a multimedia artist. As I mentioned before, we cannot connect his music with the past musical epochs (or at least not as bold as we might consider a true influence from some other composers’ styles).

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