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    Oda Nobunaga Warlords

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    Oda Nobunaga: A profile Warlords. A blanket term used to describe used to describe non-state actors with substantial military, economic, and other influences. The very existence of warlords violates the Westphalian Constitution in which states have absolute sovereignty in their territory. Often, when people think of the word “warlord”, they would picture some rebel leader in an African country engaged in warfare against the government. For many, the word “warlord” evokes negative images

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    true. Many events led up to the battle of Sekigahara. An event that caused this significant battle was the death of Toyotomi Hideyoshi, the shogun of Japan at the time. Toyotomi Hideyoshi was the shogun who finished what the previous shogun, Oda Nobunaga, was unable to complete. He was able to unite the whole of Japan. At the age of 62, he passed away left his 8 year old son to be his heir. He appointed 5 regents to rule Japan for his son for the current time as he was close to death. When he finally

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    Medieval Japanese Castles

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    Despite the hundreds of castles built in the Medieval Japanese time period only twelve survive to this very day. The history of Medieval Japanese castles are still evident in today’s society through structures, buildings or documents. After much research on castles in Medieval Japan I came to the question of ‘What was the purpose of constructing castles in the time of Medieval Japan?’ Two castles in particular are testament to this and answer the question. These castles are the Himeji Castle and

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    Dbq Samurais

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    The sacrifices of a samurai were not easy. They gave up their own lives to serve the lives of their masters. By doing so, they would miss major achievements of their own children and were just a thought or memory to friends and families. Samurais had to face the toughest training and endured gruesome battles. At the same time, about 4,200 miles away (6,772 km), European knights were doing the same. In medieval times, the toughest warriors arose from the dirt that made up Europe and Japan. Knights

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    Japan’s Tokugawa (or Edo) period, lasted from 1603 to 1867. This was the final era of the traditional Japanese government before the modern era. The Qin dynasty lasted from 221-206BC. Thought it was brief, it was very important in Chinese history. The main weakness of the Tokugawa was an internal crisis and Western intrusion. However, the Tokugawa had a great economy, commerce and manufacturing industry. The strengths of the Qing Dynasty were the ability to improve methods of irrigation, which increased

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    Japan is an island country in East Asia along the Pacific Ocean with a population of about 127 million and an approximate 146 square mile area. It 's biggest religions are Shintoism and Buddhism. It 's biggest city is Tokyo which used to be known as Edo Japan in the 1600s. Edo Japan rose about in the early 1600s after the death of Hideyoshi. It was a time of peace, stability and economic growth. The military (shogunate) were primarily in control and the shogun was Tokugawa Ieyashu. He established

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    Tokugawa Ieyasu

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    struggling warlord in the province of Mikawa, somewhat to the north of present day Nagoya” (colombia.edu). Out of the many generals that fought in the sengoku jidai, he was one that became very famous. In the battle of Mikatagahara, he was allying with Oda Nobunaga which helped him during that battle. The Sengoku Jidai period started in 1467 and ended in 1567 and was ended because he created an unopposed shogunate. Tokugawa Ieyasu was important because he was very patient, made alliances, and ended the Sengoku

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    great unifiers. Oda Nobunaga, one of the great unifiers, had a lowly start similar to Soun Hojo. Oda, a young daimyo during the 1560's, was attacked by one of Japan's most powerful daimyos, Imagawa Yoshimoto. After breaking through the border of Nobunaga's fortresses, Yoshimoto grew complacent and oblivious. Nobunaga seized this opportunity to turn the tides of the battle; Yoshimoto was killed, and Nobunaga instantly rose in power. Within eight years of defeating Yoshimoto, Nobunaga in 1568 entered

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    There was a time in the history of Japan when the country was in chaos, as there was lawlessness, a civil war, warlords and feudal battles… Ironically, the Sengoku period, which started in 1467 and ended in 1573 is commonly known as the “Warring States” period because of all that happened. Almost every warrior in this period, set up their own armies and became warlords to contribute to this chaos. The Sengoku period started off with the Ōnin War (1467-1477)

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    During his warrior career, Yukimori supported the cause of Amako Katsuhisa, including the Siege of Kōzuki Castle. He even tried to get help from the Oda clan. Unfortunately, Oda Nobunaga only used him so the Oda army could march deeper into the Mōri clan's lands. Akechi Mitsuhide and Hashiba Hideyoshi wanted to give him reinforcements, but Nobunaga refused. Therefore, those two generals were forced into concentrating on laying siege to the Mōri and Ukita castles rather than helping Yukimori. By 1563

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    ad been past. Some people say that Buddhism was Japan's only religion, was Buddhism actually past down to different people? In this document i'll be researching about the religion Buddhism, Medieval Japan, also Japan's art and culture in Japan. Japan in the Middle Ages has had many firsts happen like during the Medieval period time. *Back during the 6th century BC, in India, Buddhism was originated. Buddhism's main branch it came from was Mahayana, (Greater Vehicle). China and Korea also, got

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    In the seventeenth century, Japan was recovering from the Warring States period, a period of war and strife. The Tokugawa clan, after seizing power at the start of the century, soon embraced isolationism as their social policy, a policy that historians later called “sakoku,” or “closed country” policy. Under sakoku policy, Japanese natives were forbidden to leave the country unlicensed, and foreign trade was restricted, with European trade cut out entirely (Ohno). Tokugawa Iemitsu installed the policy

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    was successful at putting ninjas into service. This loyal samurai was born in Mikawa Province and was known for his planning and strategy war. “During the Tensho Iga War, Hanzo planned a brilliant defense of the ninja homeland in Iga Province against Oda Nobukatsu in 1579” (Turnbull,S). This shows that he is known for planning strategies. This is important because it helps his clan to have a better chance of winning. “Hanzo is also a stoic enigma who desires for his master to rule” which was evident

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    other ali’i using strategic timing of attacks, strong alliances with other ali’i such as Ke’eaumoku, and assistance from foreign advisors with weapons and strategies. Ieyasu, by aiding Oda Nobunaga and Toyotomi Hideyoshi, played a major role in the unification of Japan. Ieyasu came into power after outliving Nobunaga and Hideyoshi and emerging victorious in the battle of Sekigahara that made him the first national leader of Japan. Both Kamehameha and Ieyasu were effective leaders because they were

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    Openness In Japan

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    In a Eurocentric point of view, Japan was seen as a relatively “closed” country throughout the Tokugawa Period in comparison to the new technologies of the West that increased the possibilities of overseas contact and trade. Although the main island of Jama, Honshu, was surrounded by different groups of people (the Ainu, Chinese, Korean and Ryukyus) the dominant ethnic group known as the Wajin, were not particularly fond of anything foreign. They were also extremely suspicious of religions besides

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    The Tokugawa Period

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    The Tokugawa (or Edo) period lasted from 1603 to 1867. It was Japan’s final era of traditional Japanese government, culture and society before the Meiji Restoration in 1868. It began in 1568, when Japan’s “Three Reunifiers” – Oda Nobunaga, Toyotomi Hideyoshi, and Tokugawa Ieyasu – worked to bring back central control. It was in 1603 when Tokugawa Ieyasu finished the task and established the Tokugawa Shogunate. In Japan, the warrior samurai held the most power, followed by farmers, artisans and traders

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    CONCLUSION Hideyoshi contributed militarily, culturally and politically to Japan. Militarily, he was a tough warrior. Culturally, he made Osaka Castle as beautiful as it was strong. Inspired by Kinkaku-ji in Kyoto (the Golden Pavilion), he constructed a fabulous portable tea-room covered with gold leaf. Using this mobile innovation he was able to practice the tea ceremony wherever he went, powerfully projecting his unrivalled power and status. Politically, he set up a governmental system that balanced

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