Socrates Essays

Sort By:
  • Better Essays

    Forms Of Protest

    • 1932 Words
    • 8 Pages

    Do to Socrates' carefree lifestyle of no conformity, he was often accused of breaking laws and customs. Similarly, The Apology and Crito, speaks of Socrates experience with these accusations and how he believes persuasion is the most effective means of protest. The Apology is a dialogue written by Plato in 399 BC. The Apology features a speech presented by Socrates during his trial with the government.

    • 1932 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Plato's Unexamined Life

    • 1628 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Plato’s famous philosophical text, Apology, is the account of Socrates’ trial for attempting to corrupt the youth and challenging the popular belief in the Greek Gods. Socrates’ wisely stated during the trial that, “the unexamined life is not worth living for a human being” (Apology). His idea of the good life was a life in which one’s complete self seeks out the universal truths and if his ideas were applied to our modern society, they would still be largely applicable. Socrates’ use of the phase ‘the unexamined life’ could have multiple meanings and applications.

    • 1628 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    What Is Socrates Apology

    • 755 Words
    • 4 Pages

    During his trial, Socrates is being charged with corrupting the youth of Athens and not believing in the Gods. The rebuttal Socrates uses for being accused with corrupting the youth of Athens is "... either I do not corrupt them, or I corrupt them unintentionally, so that on either view of the case you lie. If my offence is unintentional, the law has no cognizance of unintentional offences: you ought to have taken me privately, and warned and admonished me; for if I had been better advised, I should have left off doing what I only did unintentionally - no doubt I should; whereas you hated to converse with me or teach me, but you indicted me in this court, which is a place not of instruction, but of punishment." Meaning that he hasn 't been corrupting the youth but if he was then he 's not the only one doing so.

    • 755 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Socrates was sentenced to death by drinking a deadly poison, however, Socrates could have escaped into exile instead he chose become a martyr. In this scene, he has been sentenced to death for corrupting the youths of Athens and for not believing in the gods of their tradition. He is being defiant

    • 1516 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Plato's Theory Of Phaedo

    • 683 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The Phaedo is Plato’s last written dialogue among four chronicling the final days of Socrates, in this dialogue Plato documents the very last moments of Socrates death in his prison cell. Socrates is incarcerated due to a guilty verdict by the Athenian courts for corrupting the youth through the influence of his philosophies which are contrary to that of the Athenian state and sentenced to death. Plato’s documentation of Socrates death is based on the first-hand account of Phaedo who is narrating the events to Echecrates in the town of Phlius. According to Phaedo, Socrates was surrounded by devoted friends who upon entering Socrates cell find that he had just been released from his chains and is composing a hymn to honor Apollo. The hymn provoked a philosophical conversation in which Socrates proclaims not to fear death.

    • 683 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    “ECHECRATES: Were you with Socrates yourself, Phaedo, on the day when he drank the poison in prison, or did someone else tell you about.” The Athenian Government put Socrates to death by making him drink poison, therefore freeing the youth of Athens from of the danger that was thought to be of Socrates. Much like in the Myth of Theseus how defeats the Minotaur and Athens no longer sacrifice its people to King Minos. The most relatable part of Socrates Death to the Greek Myth of Theseus is not the comparison of the Athenian Government to Theseus, or Socrates to the Minotaur, the closest resemblance of

    • 710 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Within the greater work, The Trial and Death of Socrates, Socrates’ own defense against the people of Athens begs the questions of whether Athens was a just society. Punished to death, Socrates’ is forever a martyr for his ideals and his debate unjust death begins Plato’s exploration into Justice. Through The Apology, Plato explains how the silencing of Socrates is a harsh injustice due to the democratic nature of his trial that strips the moral absolution from Justice as well as shows that Athens, as society of individualist justice, has failed in instilling order that allows for greater unity as a perfect Whole. Plato elects to transcribe the final defense of Socrate so to highlight why exactly Socrates’ death was unwarranted. To Plato, Socrates was a hero; furthermore, his service to the city of Athens is irreplaceable.

    • 1102 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Socrates had always questioned everything, as he said in Ancient Philosophy of Religion: The History of Western Philosophy of Religion, “.....” (...). In the story of Plato, Socrates talks about death and what happens after it. Socrates embraces the idea of death because it is the nature of life then we soon or later faces to death. Socrates “desire to prove to [people] that the real philosopher has reason to be of good cheer when he is about to die and that after death he may hope to obtain the greatest good in the other world.”

    • 1583 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Socrates was executed in 399 B.C.E in Athens, his infamous trial was documented by his student, Plato who distributed "The Apology," 40-50 after the trial occurred. Socrates allowed himself to be put on trial because he believed that his death would shine light on his life as well as his teachings; thus, he intentionally lost the trial. At 70, Socrates was put on trial for atheism, his investigation of things below and aloft of the Earth, his education to younger students, and the corruption of the youth of Athens; these charges were pressed Meletus, Anytus, and Lycon. Throughout the entirety of the trial he never stopped talking and searched for justification for

    • 715 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    An insight Socrates offers about the self is that there is a conflict between the soul and the body. The soul, which aspires for goodness and pure knowledge, truth, and courage, is weighed down by the body, which is concerned with the less divine and pure pleasures of the earth. It desires objects of lust, sex, and greed, which are physical. These desires chain down the soul, and prevent it from moving towards ultimate goodness and truth after the death of the physical body. As the soul leaves the body, it moves on to another body.

    • 743 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Apology: Socrates Assignment In Apology, Socrates intent was not to apologize for his ideas and beliefs to the people of Athens, his purpose was to defend his practices by confronting his accusers, which put him on trial. Socrates charges consisted of inventing new deities, not recognizing the states Gods, and corrupting Athens youth minds. Socrates began his trial by speaking of his old accusers and the famous book The Cloud, acknowledging that people disagreed with him in his teachings. He then continued by turning from his old accusers to the current ones, more specifically Meletus.

    • 713 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Socrates Apology Analysis

    • 1070 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Socrates was a great philosopher of the Greek world. He was quite an atypical and distinctive person. Being different from all the other philosophers of the land, Socrates was teaching his students ideas totally out of the ordinary from what the society believed was right. As a result, he displeased many people so much that they decided to get rid of him. Socrates was put to trial, accused of spoiling the youth of Athens, tried and sentenced to death.

    • 1070 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The ‘Apology’ is a form of dialectic philosophy. It illustrates the charges brought upon Socrates and the self-defense he demonstrates during the trial. Socrates is accused of ‘corruption of the youth’ and ‘impiety’. Socrates is found guilty of having faith in the wrong Gods and Meletus accuses him of not acknowledging the sun and moon as gods but as masses of stone. Socrates is accused of studying things in heaven and below the earth.

    • 837 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    I believe Socrates would affirm to the Self-chosen commitment response to life’s meaning. Having a Self-chosen commitment response is when one believes that the meaning of life is created by what one chooses. In The Apology Socrates describes his mission by using an analogy of a horse and a gadfly. He believes that God has sent him to this city to rouse the people. They have been living uninformed and sluggish lives

    • 226 Words
    • 1 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    It would seem that the reasoning that Socrates uses about halfway into the Apology (just after he has finished speaking with Meletus) for why it would be illogical to fear death should also work inversely. That is to say that the very same reasoning would also seem to suggest that it would be illogical to look forward to death. Therefore, when Socrates suggests, towards the end of the dialogue, that he is actually looking forward to dying, one might be tempted to conclude that he is contradicting his own logic. However, on closer examination of the wording and the context of these two discussions of death, one can see that he has, in fact, not contradicted himself, after all.

    • 1397 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Socrates, an Athenian philosopher of Ancient Greece, a man of great wisdom and knowledge, was put to death at trial, by the accusation of impiety, and corrupting the youths of society. “The Apology” written by Plato, the Defence of Socrates as it would sound, gives us an overview of what happened at the trial. Socrates had a few accusations up against him and they weren 't that simple to defend against, but that did not stop him, he came prepared and knew what he was in for, that gave him the upper hand and he was able to successfully and flawlessly defend against any accusation and statement that the accusers sent out against him. The main Accuser was Melytus, he was supported by most of the assembly and his two compatriots Anytus and Lycon.

    • 1220 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Socrates Vs Plato

    • 556 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The book starts out with Socrates and Glaucon heading home from a festival. While on their way home they are interrupted by a group of their friends who eventually convince them to come hang out with them for a while. Once they arrived at the house, Socrates sees his old friend Cephalous, who is Polermarchus father. The two starting catching up and eventually started talking about being old. As their conversation continues it starts changing subjects from being old to what justice really is and means, which is what leads to the whole topic of the book.

    • 556 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Socrates Dialectics

    • 1351 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Socrates concludes his discussion on gymnastics and moves onto the subject of mathematics in book seven. Plato explains the four branches of study: mathematics, plane geometry, solid geometry and astronomy. While gymnastics and music aid in creating a harmonious soul, mathematics is meant to instill wisdom and knowledge within an individual. Socrates belief is that an individual should first study and fully understand the basics of mathematics before advancing to plane geometry, solid geometry and astronomy. Socrates believed that studying the four branches of mathematics would ensure an individual exhibited true wisdom.

    • 1351 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Part A- Socrates In thinking of Socrates we must recognize that what we have is four secondhand sources depicting him. That of Plato, Xenophanes, Aristophanes, and Aristotle. All having radically different accounts on Socrates and his views. Out of all them we consider Plato’s to be the most possible account, even though we face a problem of different versions of Socrates.

    • 767 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays