Walter Gropius Essays

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Walter Gropius Essays

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    Walter Gropius (Fig.1) was a German architect and the founder of Bauhaus; a German art school operated from 1919 to 1933 in Weimar. The institute was famous for the approach to design under the idea of creating a ‘total work of art’ in which all artistic medias, including architecture, fine art, industrial design, graphic design, typography and interior design would be combined. This style later became one of the most influential ideals in modern design. Gropius decided to leave Germany in 1934

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    ornamentation. ' Walter Gropius Modernism design came in many forms from door handles to influential architectural feats. The Machine age made artists think differently and influence design today. In the following essay, I will analysis the work of Walter Gropius, an early modern German architect and how his designs had an impact on an improving society and his moral ideas. I will also discuss whether Modernist ideas and principles may still be relevant to contemporary design through the work of Gropius.

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    The Bauhaus movement, founded by Walter Gropius in 1919, which birthed the Bauhaus building was an influential movement in the Modernism era. The key characteristics of the Bauhaus movement were anti-historicism, clean and geometric shapes and forms and simplistic design. (Bauhaus, 2016) Walter Gropius had a great vision for the Bauhaus movement and aimed to make design and art a social concern during the post-war turmoil. The movement was a contemporary movement and sought out to be rid of the previous

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    Bauhaus Architecture

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    education as formulated by Gropius in the Manifesto” (Droste, 2002, p.40). Geometric shapes and functional style the Bauhaus heralded the modern age of architecture and design. Founded in 1919 by Walter Gropius and directed afterwards by Hannes Meyer and Ludwig Mies Van de Rohe, the Bauhaus is today considered to be the most important schools of art, design, and architecture of the 20th century. Dessau in Germany, a two hour train ride from Berlin; there in 1926 Walter Gropius built his higher academy

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    History Of The Bauhaus

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    contemporary design. This school was founded by Walter Gropius and was known for its new and innovative approach to design in Germany in the early 20th century.Bauhaus base their principles on the fact that design should look good and respond to the needs of the people and the industry along with meeting the social requirements such as functions, price and aesthetics. It was all about functional and purposeful design. The masters of the Bauhaus were Walter Gropius, Johannes Itten, Wassily Kandinsky, Paul

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    Bauhaus Design

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    The Gropius’s Bauhaus attracted the fabulously talented faculties, the creators of the school’s program. Many of the most influential designers of the twenty century taught or studied there: Marcel Breuer in furniture, Bayer in graphics, Gropius and Mies van der Rohe in architecture, Anni Albers and Gunta Stӧlzl in textiles, Oskar Schlemmer in theater design, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy in film; working alongside them were great artists Josef Alberts, Paul Klee and Wassily Kandinsky. There were political

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    the social environment, and glass is one of the most significant elements towards the cultural revolution in this sense. Then, there is a building called Fagus Factory designed by Walter Gropius in line with the idea that extracted from the quote. This industrial building was constructed by glass and brick. In Gropius mind, he thinks the there is a lack of the authenticity in terms of the outside of the building. Therefore, he discovered a way to use the design of exterior to show the actual construction

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    the history Modern architecture, and the ideals behind it, as well as the negative impact on American artist and architecture that he believed it had. Modern architecture was born out of Germany in 1919 with creation of the Bauhaus school by Walter Gropius. World World I had just ended and the country was in shambles, which sparked the architectural ideology of “starting from zero.” It was time to rebuild Germany from the

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    Essay On Utopian Society

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    Chapter 1.0 Introduction "The day a utopian community died." – claimed by postmodern architect Charles Jencks to mark. Great ideal and characters always appear at different era, contributing our society and the world. Even the best, there are also have failed time in the past and not remain today. With the growing of human society, peoples are always wanted to create a perfect place to live since the past. The term utopia was coined in Greek by Sir Thomas More for his 1516 book Utopia, describing

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    Epoka University Faculty of Architecture and Engineering Department of Architecture ARCH IV ARCH418 PhD. Ernest Shtepani Shasivar Rada ID:02021120 Delirious New York Retroactive Manifesto for Manhattan Rem Koolhaas Our role is not to retreat back to the catacombs, but to became more human in skyscraper Manhattan is the theatre for

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    Schroder House Analysis

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    SITE ANALYSIS: Located in central Holland, in a small city called Utrecht, the Schroder Rietvield house lies in midst a neoclassical neighborhood that is mainly constructed of brick. This modernist house is merely an intruder to this rather homogeneous neighborhood, as it is clearly noticeable upon encountering it. I was startled when I encountered the Schroder house on Hendriklaan street as I felt like I was out of place. The Schroder housesits on the corner of Hendriklaan Street, facing a

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    Building Materials Used in Art-Nouveau Architecture Art-Nouveau is a type of architecture popularized around the world between 1890 and World War 1. The literal translation of “Art Nouveau” is “New Art,” and that idea varied from region to region, although these variations were similar is their core purpose. Art Nouveau artists also wanted to elevate decorative arts (ceramics, furniture, metalwork, stained glass, etc.) to equality with fine arts like painting and sculpture. Art Nouveau stressed

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    Discuss the context and the key principles of the Charter of Athens; assess its influence on late twentieth century urbanism, in a range of cities. The Charter of Athens was a modernist manifesto that was published in 1943 by the Swiss architect Le Corbusier, who had a major influence on urban planning and architecture after World War II. His work was heavily based upon Le Corbusier’s Ville Radieuse (Radiant City) book of 1935 that was written by the Congres International d’Architecture Moderne

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    An important factor of post-industrial landscapes is preservation of the industrial past. There are two different ways to treat historic architecture and landscapes: one is to create a static monument to the past and the other is to focus on dynamic processes and focus on the time passing. In the design of post-industrial sites, the first way is expressed by a return to the preindustrial era when industry did not intervene with nature like the 1962 design proposal of a Victorian-style landscape

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    Frank Lloyd Wright is considered to be the pioneer of modern architecture. He created an identity for American architecture, while rejecting Neoclassical and Victorian style designs. Wright called this “organic architecture”. It is architecture that is simple, yet modern and co-exists with architecture. He provided a new perspective on architecture and “The American Style”. He was able to study the American society and its nature and accommodate it with the ideal living and commercial spaces. Frank

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    Le Corbusier’s renowned building in the 1920s probably is Villa Savoye Poissy (1928-30) (Figure 1), there are tremendous impact on international modernism.Villa Savoye designed to be functional and to revolve around people’s daily lives. With its systematic efficiency, lack of ornamentation and clean lines. "Geometry is the language of man.’’(Le Corbusier 1931 Towards a new architecture United states of America Dover Publication).He state that this new style aspired to represent what was thought

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    4) To what extent Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux have contributed to the professional practice of Landscape Architecture. Both Frederick Law and Calvert Vaux are actively participating in Landscape Architectural projects in the 19th century. Calvert Vaux being a young Architect in the year 1857 collaborated with Frederick Law in the Central Park competition. Apart from landscape projects Vaux also committed himself as an architect designing various houses that harmonises with nature. Frederick

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    Printmaking Studio Essay

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    Druckstelle is a printmaking studio situated in Berlin/Kreuzberg Germany. Printmaking is the process of making artworks by printing normally on a material . The studio was established in 2001 by two artists Eva Pietzcker and Miriam Zegrer. From 2008 the Druckstelle studio was continued alone by Eva Pietzcker , Miriam Zegrer now has opened her own studio. The studio is not an open studio and also does not offer residencies. The studio space is used to practice research and for teaching innovative

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    DECONSTRUCTIVISM According to the Merriam Webster dictionary, to construct is to build, make or create something. The opposite of this action is to deconstruct. In architecture, this word evolved to “Deconstructivism” – a movement that emerged from the postmodernism era at the end of the 1980’s. This means it definitely goes against the limits given in modernism in terms of forms, materials and functionality. Just like the meaning of deconstruction itself, the structures in this movement are known

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    Wright, An American Architecture In the excerpts from "An American Architecture", Wright discusses the idea of continuity and interior spaces. In his introduction he states that continuity to him is something natural and truly organic architecture which can be achieved by the technology of machines or the natural technique. Additionally, Wright emphasizes on the idea of plasticity, the treatment of a building as a whole as seen in the work of Louis Sullivan, whose work he appreciates. Moreover,

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