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Waterborne diseases Essays

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    Worldwide, infectious diseases such as waterborne diseases are the number one killer of children under five years old and more people die from unsafe water annually than from all forms of violence, including war. (WHO 2002) Water-borne diseases are any illness caused by drinking water contaminated with human or animal faeces, which contain pathogenic microorganisms. (Lenntech) Contaminated water in developing countries is becoming worse and worse as time passes. It is common for women and girls have

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    environmental problems are the threat to species and water pollution with water born viruses such as pathogen being the serious threat. “nearly a billion people around the world are exposed to waterborne pathogen pollution daily and around 1.5 million children mainly in underdeveloped countries die every year of waterborne diseases from pathogens. Pathogens enter water primarily from human and animal fecal waste due to inadequate sewage treatment.” (Dorsner, 2017) That in mind, the possibility of decrease

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    already rely on the source. Another reason to why Chloramines are dangerous because it is toxic to aquatic life, including the mosquito fish, the mosquito fishes are put into our ponds to control the mosquito populations. Mosquitos carry several diseases. Another statement the article made is “ The state and federal gov. has said the water treated with this chemical is safe.” But that is not true if you can still get asthma, eczema, and etc. The only difference is it takes longer. Chlorine will

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    Bottled water is widely used and known in the US. It has become part of our culture and ranges second in sales to carbonated soft drinks. Though we Americans love our bottled water, some people have questioned bottled water and think that it should be banned. This is nonsense because bottled water is an important source of hydration and we should not take it away from people. Bottled water should not be banned because in some places fresh water isn’t always available, water is essential after emergencies

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    and how to prevent it. According to Food and Water Watch there are over 780 million people all over the earth that are living without clean drinking water. Another fact is every 20 seconds a child under five years old dies from illnesses that are waterborne. There is a lot of information about water contamination, the main topics are, effects of the percentage of water contaminated, ways it gets contaminated, and what to do in the after-math. There are many effects of water contamination due to the

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    Neolithic Beer History

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    Neolithic period because of its medical benefits. During the Neolithic period, there was no system of purification; thus, the river water used by the respective civilizations are vulnerable to contamination. A lack of clean water led to many waterborne diseases. On the other hand, beer requires boiling water; the process of boiling water killed off the germs and made the water safe to drink. In addition, the alcohol in beer made it a useful antiseptic in cleaning wounds. The abundance of wheat made

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    Long Walk To Water

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    Linda Sue Park’s A Long Walk to Water describes a hot, sunny day in Southern Sudan, where an 11 year old girl named Nya was on her first two hour walk of the day, to fetch water for her family from a pond that was located two hours away from her home. She makes the walk every day, twice a day, carrying a giant plastic container. The journey takes her half a morning while the other one takes half a night. While she is one out of thousands who walk hours a day just to be able to find water for their

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    The presence of bacteria and pathogenic organisms is a concern when considering the safety of drinking water. Pathogenic organisms can cause intestinal infections, dysentery, hepatitis, typhoid fever, cholera, and other illnesses. Sources of Bacteria in Drinking Water: The Need for Water Testing Human and animal wastes are a primary source of bacteria in water. These sources of bacterial contamination include runoff from feedlots, pastures, dog runs, and other land areas where animal wastes are deposited

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    Typhoid fever is a very serious disease that you can get from almost anywhere in the world.Parts of the world where sanitation levels and hygiene are poor you will be at a higher risk of getting the typhoid disease. It is mostly common in parts of the world except highly advanced countries like the United States, Canada, Western Europe, Australia, and Japan. The places that are highly risked is Asia, Africa, and Latin America, South Asia is highest at risk. About 300 people that travel outside of

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    Water Shortage In China

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    Introduction
Water shortage and water pollution is an urgent crisis in China and is the cause of millions of deaths each year. According to Chinadialogue “(…) water pollution poses a bigger health threat to about 300 million people living in rural areas, and many of them are vulnerable and disadvantaged” (Lin, 2014). This essay addresses water management issues in rural China and suggests more investments should be made in local water management. First, to assess why China should invest more in local

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    Human being, marine ecosystem, and countries’ economy are the main factors that are affected by water contamination. Drinking polluted water and eating poisoned seafood would cause many health issues, such as cancers and kidney diseases. As a consequence of water pollution, marine life is suffering from oxygen deficiency, and the continuous numbers of deaths are increasing. As a result, the economies of the exporter countries would find reduction in the amounts of the aquatic animals

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    Everyone succeeds more when they dedicate themselves the fullest. Abroad, hiking deep in the mountains requires coordination, overcoming extensive physical walls, and striking dangers. When our group tackled the French border, our hard work got the results we only had wished. As my foot crossed the line, my language trip to Spain was lifted off the ground. Trekking over peaks demanded having ample coordination. With the time we were given to climb over the mountains, we needed to have great logistics

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    and water borne illnesses will sicken the United States inhabitants, and an additional 3,000 people will die from those illnesses. Food and water safety is crucial to the public because it directly affects people’s health, and without good hygiene diseases will spread quickly. It is also important to point out that many people live in conditions where they do not have access to resources necessary for human survival, and these are the ones that need the most assistance. For many, it is due to the carelessness

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    Research Miami-Dade County 's "Urban Development Boundary" and state whether or not you support its existence and explain your position. Cite sources APA style. The expansion and growth of cities and towns are exciting for most of its residents. Commonly, when a city or town expands in landmass it potentially means job growth, more foreign investment (infrastructure), and an increase in the population. Most of the time expansion is good, however, in Miami-Dade case, it may be good for business and

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    Portage Canal Analysis

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    Biological Analyses of the Portage Canal By Luke Treutel – Graduate Student – The University of Wisconsin-Madison Completed with assistance from the City of Portage and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources 1 INTRODUCTION Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Portage Canal is a significant historic landmark which has played a major role in shaping the City of Portage into what it is today. Completed in 1851, it allowed transit of ships between the Wisconsin and Fox Rivers

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    According to the article “How Tap Water Became Toxic in Flint, Michigan,” written by Sara Ganim and Linh Tran, the residents of Flint, Michigan highly disapproved of the new water source. Around 2 years ago, the city of Flint was forced to switch their water supply from Lake Huron to a more local source, Flint River. Before, this was not a big problem to the residents of Flint because they were told that the water they were drinking was harmless. However, people began to doubt that the water

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    hurt several humans and animals. A total of 11 workers died from the fatal explosion, and many marine mammals were washing up onto the shore dead. Scientist started to study the animals and noticed many were underweight, and started to develop many diseases caused by the oil spill. A grand total of 200 million gallons of oil was spilled into the Gulf of Mexico within 87 days. The polluted water stretched out to 1,100 miles, and the clean up was not going to be easy at all. This should be the final straw

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    All water is reused. It may be used and used again in its journey from deposition as rain to eventual mixing with the sea (James and Edward, 2006). There is no doubt that water is essential in our daily life. The water we drink every day, is it safe to drink? Water quality is measure by several factors, such as the concentration of dissolved oxygen, bacteria levels, the amount of salt or the amount of suspended material in the water. The concentration of microscopic algae and quantities of pesticides

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    Clean Water In Haiti

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    As seen in Image two, placing the homes on stilts would limit flooding damage and the spread of disease through stagnant water. Because the homes are plastic and non porous, it would make them easier to sanitize with soap and water or bleach. One home can be easily built by four people who have no previous knowledge in construction in only 5 days. An entire shelter for 14 families can be assembled by 15 people in ten days. These plastic structures can be utilized as homes, schools, clinics, etc.

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    Desalination is a common solution to supply fresh water in many regions of the world where face with water scarcity [1]. Water scarcity is one of the most important problems in many parts of Iran and desalination of saline water (sea and brackish water) is the monopolized solution to provide water for drinking, agricultural and industrial purposes [2]. The majority of water resource does not satisfy to the desirable levels of chemical properties, such as hardness, nitrate contamination, heavy metals

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