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Witch trials Essays

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    Witch Trials Events

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    Recent Events Similar to the Salem Witch Trials The Salem Witch Trials were definitely a brief, but dark, period in early American history. The mass hysteria that was created during this period could occur today; many people will say that there have been some events that have caused a form of hysteria much like the Salem Witch Trials in recent years. Two of those events include the Red Scare in the early 1950s and the terrorist attacks on American in 2001. Both of those events caused mass paranoia

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    The Salem Witch Trial

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    were accused of leading the others into the rituals, and hence arrested. Another 150 other villagers were accused and arrested for suspicion of witchcraft after a witch hunt until the main verdicts were sentenced. Besides the falsely convicted villagers, all except one girl, were hung. The burial point where the Salem Witch trials took place, to this day, remains a mystery. Gallows Hill is recorded in the records taken by the villagers to be the place of execution. On the contrary, evidence is

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    The Salem Witch Trials were one of the most dreadful times in the history of Massachusetts; many people got put to death for absurd reasons. The trials began because a few teenage girls essentially bored with their puritan lives; they wanted to do something different. Therefore; they forced many people to believe that there was an evil power among them, encased in friends, neighbors, and even family members. This preposterous theory that the girls brought to the small, quaint, puritan town of Salem

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    Witch Trials Theory

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    My theory of the Salem Witch trials is quite simple. I believe that these trials were fueled by panic, stress, and rumor. I say rumor, due to the fact that young, adolecent girls usually seem to spread the word a lot. Girls followed strict rules withtin their religion, as well as boys, BUT, girls were usually tending to the house. They never got outside, as boys did to hunt, and explore the outdoors, as written in Evidence Set C: Puritan Children. Now, it is said at Evidence D: Salem Villager Biographies

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    The Salem witch trials were the prosecution of people accused of witchcraft in Massachusetts from June to September 1692 by the Court of Oyer and Terminer. Though the trials were held in Salem, the accused were brought in from the neighboring towns of Amesbury, Andover, Topsfield, Ipswich, and Gloucester as well. To this day the trials are considered the epitome of injustice, paranoia, scapegoating, mass hysteria, and mob justice. The results were almost 200 arrests, 19 executed “witches”, one man

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    During the Salem Witch Trials in 1692, they used to tie accused witches to chairs and throw them in a lake, if they sank they were innocent. The Salem Witchcraft Trials were crazy, irrational and disturbing times. Young girls accused their neighbors and strangers of practicing witchcraft. The town decided to hold trials to see whether or not the accused really were witches. While they awaited their trials, they were held in a filthy jail. Everyone was scared and suspicious, the town was in chaos

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    Tituba Salem Witch Trial

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    The Salem witch trials are an outstanding example of a dysfunction in a “perfect” society. Tituba as part of that society helps us understand the simpleness of a complex shaped idea. Notwithstanding that Tituba is considered irrelevant during the Salem trials, nevertheless Tituba exposes European perceptions of Native Americans as a basis for cultural superiority and oppression, since Tituba is an indisputable symbol of injustice, of an ignominious drama, slavery, racism, as well as the defamation

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    Paranoia and blame Affected the Salem Witch Trials and the McCarthy hearings In the 1690’s, a wave of fear for the devil washed over Salem, Massachusetts, resulting in the accusations of 200 supposed witches and the execution of 20. Almost 200 years later, after World War II, communists were highly feared. The strong urge to stay away from communists led to the McCarthy hearings where many innocent people were accused and tried for being communists. The Salem trials and the McCarthy hearings have many

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    How would you react if you were accused of being involved in witchcraft? In today’s time no one is phased at the thought of being called a witch, but back in the seventeenth century that was a growing concern among the people. Within the seventeenth century individuals of the Puritan religion began to move to Colonial America with the ideas of religious freedom. However, the concept of religious freedom did not go very far. Once they were settled in Colonial America, the Puritans began to prosecute

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    little, when the people went against each other during King William’s War. I have been around many years, just as you. I have lost friends and family ties with disputes over depending on agriculture or not. Oh! What stupidity, Governor. Now that the Witch trials have begun, they need to come to a stop. I have lost enough already and that’s enough. This January, a group of young ladies went into the woods and danced and chanted loudly in the night with their miraculous voices. Funny thing was, Reverend

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    were full, Governor Phips ordered that a special court, named Court of Oyer and Terminer, to come into existence only for witch hearings in June 1692. Bridget Bishop was the first accused witch to be tried. According to historian Bishop claimed that she did not know what a witch was, however she said something that possibly sealed her fate. She stated that if she was a witch, they would know it. The justices then took this statement as an admission of guilt and that she was an invisible threat. Bridget

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    Salem Witch Trials

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    In the Salem Witch first instance of witchery is Betty/Elizabeth Parris, along with Abigail Williams when they started to scream and giggle uncontrollably, along with delusions, vomiting, muscle spasms, screaming, and writhing. William Griggs, a physician, diagnosed witchcraftery to the women. Soon, fueled by resentment and paranoia, more and more women were accused of being witches, while the community and system of justice piled up. The Trials had lasted from 1692 to 1693. Some women acted peculiar

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    happened from June 10th to September 22nd. Twenty innocent women were put to death in a small town by the name of, Salem Boston. This was called the “ Salem Witch Trials.” The Salem Witch Trials were due to a variety of things. Jealousy , lying, and attention are 3 of most important factors. Without a doubt, one cause of the witch trial hysteria was jealousy. One piece of evidence that supports this claim is that, on document E, you can see that west side of town, which was the poorer side

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    Mayhem, madness, and chaos are some adjectives that describe the Salem witch Trials era. It was a time of confusion and fear for the thought of witches had invaded the town of Salem. However, there are some scientific explanations for the outbursts. Some theorist believe there was a ergot poisoning epidemic within the town. Consuming a grain of rye that is contaminated ergot fungus can lead to convulsions and hallucinations. This would explain why Abigail and the other girls claimed to see an apparition

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    Salem Witch Trials [p 27]. London: Lerner Publishing Group. Summary: Tituba confesses to being a witch. In her confession she makes reference to a lady in the Bible who used the same method to kill, this only further helps the ministers use religion to support the idea of witchcraft and start the salem witch trials. Validity: Reliability: This source is an extract from Lori Lee Wilsons novel The Salem Witch Trials. Lori Lee Wilson is a historian who has studied the Salem witch trials

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    The year of 1692 identified a significant event in history in the town of Salem, Massachusetts. The Salem Witch Trials revealed series of prosecutions of people being accused of witchcraft, which resulted in the executions of twenty innocent people. Out of the twenty people, fourteen of them were women were hung to death and the others died in prison. It all began with several girls that experimented with magic, which the Puritans believed they were collaborating with the Devil. Based on the Puritan

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    Miller’s play The Crucible, Mary Warren, Abigail Williams, and Tituba are instrumental in spreading the hysteria that resulted in the Salem Witch Trials. The word “Salem," is in close relation to “witchcraft," "hanging" and “hysteria" when mentioned. Many are shocked and appalled by the seeming complete lack of justice and sanity that occurred during the Salem Witch Trials of 1692, when nineteen individuals were put to their death for crimes they did not commit. Witchcraft was introduced when a group of

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    Salem Witch Trial

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    The Salem Witch Trials were a series of witchcraft cases back in 1692. Innocent “witches” and familiars were assassinated without a firm cause. People do not think this could happen again because now, they have proven how it started. This trials were made out of fear, the fear of becoming possessed. If the trials would not have happened, they would probably be happening now because of modern day beliefs and cultures. People were scared of being accused due to the fact that they knew they would perish

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    Witch Trials Dbq

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    In the spring of 1692, in a small village know at the time as Salem, tension was brewing between the local townspeople of Salem and the young women accused of witchcraft. Not many knew this yet but the trials to come over the next few months would have an enormous impact on the history of Massachusetts and America as well. Salem was a decent sized village with about 500 residents residing within the city lines. So for the most part everybody knew everybody, and one of the most popular figures

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    Geography neatly separated the supporters and opposers. For instance, the east was anti-Parris while the west was pro-Parris. People of Salem noticed there was greater support for the victims of witchcraft as the number of trials increased. During these trials, many assumed that the witches cast spells upon them to make them suffer. Yet, their assumptions all lie in the varying conception of magic. Magic was almost always related to a relationship with the Devil, which made it inherently

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