Analysis Of Three Witches Scene In Macbeth

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In this scene, there are 3 witches. These witches begin to discuss their plans. The first witch asks when they will meet and the next one states that when the commotion and fighting is over and done with and another says that this will be before the sun sets. They then begin to discuss where they will meet and they state that they will meet where Macbeth is. They then leave.

This scene introduces other characters such as Malcolm, Duncan, Lennox and Ross. In this Scene, the captain enters with battle wounds and Malcolm and Douglas immediately begin to question the captain about the battle. The captain states that Macdonwald was supported by foot soldiers and horsemen and had luck on his side. The armies were evenly matched for some time, but then Macbeth killed Macdonwald from belly button to jaw, killing him. As the troops were moving back after winning this battle, the Norwegians decide to send a fresh wave of troops to attack, but instead of fighting more lethargically, they fight with twice the power as before. Eventually, the captain recounts the whole tale and then goes to get his wounds tended. Next a man named Ross enters the scene.
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The scene starts off with the witches talking about the mean things they do to people that offend them. When Macbeth enters the scene, the Witches begin to hail saying “All hail, Macbeth! Hail to thee, thane of Glamis. All hail, Macbeth! Hail to thee, thane of Cawdor. All hail, Macbeth that shalt be king hereafter.” (Shakespeare 17). Macbeth becomes startled and confused for he is the thane of Glamis, but not the thane of Cawdor and certainly not the king. The witches disappear and then Ross and Angus enter the scene also hailing Macbeth. They then state that he is the thane of Cawdor. Macbeth is speechless for the witches prophecies came true. This makes Macbeth think about him becoming king and all of a sudden develops the urge to kill the current king,

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