The Poisonwood Bible Literary Analysis

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In the novel, The Poisonwood Bible, by Barbara Kingsolver, a missionary family travel to the African Congo during the 1960’s, in hopes of bringing enlightenment to the Congolese in terms of religion. The father, Nathan, believes wholeheartedly in his commitment, and this is ultimately his downfall when he fails to realize the damage that he is placing upon his family and onto the people living in Kilanga, and refuses to change the way he sees things. However, his wife, Orleanna, and her daughters, Rachel, Leah, Adah, and Ruth May, take the Congo in, and make the necessary changes in their lives, and they do this in order to survive with their new darkness that they are living in. Curiosity and acceptance help the ones with curious minds,…show more content…
Her completely refuses to believe that this is now her life. Her way of coping with the Congo is trying to cling to anything that reminds her of home. Her small hand mirror is something that she holds very dear. It is one of the first things she thinks of to grab in a life or death situation. Rachel never fully connects with any of the Congolese people, and finds it absolutely revolting about the idea that the Chief wants her as a wife. Her religious views are almost nonexistent throughout the novel, so she never comes to terms with if it is something she does or does not believe in. Besides her clinging to American civilization, she has nothing guide her through the darkness, and never even attempts to learn how to. She doesn 't let herself connect to anyone, except for the only other American in the village, Eeben Axelroot. Because of this, she cannot grow and adjust, only remain in the same spot she had when they had first arrived in the Congo. Turning away from a darkness that one does not want to face is a perfect way to stay in the same spot that you have been for your whole…show more content…
Each one of them face their own darkness, and each one of them overcome it in their own separate ways. However, they all have one thing in common, that the darkness fell upon them once they had entered the Congo and stepped foot in the village of Kilanga. For some, acceptance was their way of adjusting. Realization played a major role in the development of others. And one lonely daughter never fully accepted that she was in darkness, and clung to the smallest things she could find to stay in belief of this. Darkness is something that holds onto every life, and every life has a different way to overcome it, adjust to it, and most never fully accept that it is apart of their lives, and go on believing that everything is okay. If one does not accept that darkness is within that, surrounding them, or apart of their lives in some way, then they will always live in constant misery, whether knowing or
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