Examples Of Greed In Macbeth

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Macbeth’s greed with power causes danger but allows him to persist Macbeth’s greed with his power gets the best of him; he puts himself and others in danger. Macbeth chooses to kill the king and take his place. Donalbain (son of Duncan) chooses to flee with his brother for their own safety. He tells his brother“there’s daggers in men’s smiles.” (2.3.165-166) After seeing their father killed, the sons fear they are the next targets. Macbeth selfishly makes everyone in the palace feel in danger. He puts others at risk to reach his goal, making his greed a negative trait. Also, Macbeth puts the three murderers in danger when he chooses to kill Banquo and his son. Macbeth tells the murderers to “know banquo [is] your enemy” (3.1.130), making them long for revenge. He knew the blame would be pinned on the three murderers and taken off himself. If caught, the 3 men would be killed; and, it was them who had the blood from crime stained on their hands. So, when Macbeth comes face to face with Banquo’s ghost, he tells it, “thou canst not say I did it” (3.4.62) and he is free of his crime. Due to his greed, he salvaged himself…show more content…
The witches tell Macbeth he “shalt be king hereafter” (1.3.53). He then kills off Duncan, fulfilling their prophecy. When Macbeth decides whether or not to kill Duncan his greed gets the best of him and he says“I go, and it is done.” (2.1.75) . He betrays Duncan, a man who he was once loyal to, in order to achieve his goal. He’s at first guilty for the crime he commits, as shown when he says to Lady Macbeth “I am afraid to think what I have done” (2.2.66) , but he soon realizes that it’s necessary to kill Duncan if he is going to take Duncan’s place as king; his guilt slowly fades to paranoia and more greed. Macbeth takes all the necessary steps to achieve his goal no matter how extreme it may be or who he has to hurt to be
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