Summary Of Farewell To Manzanar

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Farewell to Manzanar, a historical memoir, delivers an inspiring perspective on how Japanese were treated at their time in internment. This book is highly recommended for students who are in curiosity to learn more about the Pearl Harbor bombing and how the Japanese were affected by the way they had to live. While reviewing this book, it was noticed that there was excellent content, sources and perspectives. The author also had an interesting background that inspired her to write this memoir. Although life at Manzanar seemed unbearable and tough, the memoir also describes how the Wakatsukis’ transition from their childhood memories and how they think of Mazanar as adults; especially Jeanne. The author, Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston, grew up in …show more content…

In chapter 5 titled “Almost a Family,” allows the readers to understand the affect the internment had on Jeanne and her family. This chapter discussed how the family did not eat at the table as a family like they used to. Jeanne exclaimed, “Before Manazar, mealtime had always been the center of our family scene” (Houston 35). As one can see, mealtime was an important aspect of the Wakatsukis’ lives (Houston …show more content…

The last chapter of the memoir was simply amazing when explaining how Jeanne realized what Manzanar truly meant to her. This chapter was truly inspiring for those going through a hard time and coming to terms to what has happened to them. Jeanne stated, “As I came to understand what Manazar had meant, it gradually filled me with shame for being a person guilty of something enormous enough to deserve that kind of treatment” (Houston 185). This allows the readers to imagine the shame they must have felt growing up in Manzanar. Jeanne and her family [husband and two kids] went back to Manzanar to visit. Jeanne was saying how she could almost imagine those who have once lived in Manzanar. After Jeanne realizes her life began in Manzanar and that it will always be a part of her; she comes to terms to finally say farewell to Manzanar. This does not mean she wants to forget Manzanar, but it is time to finally let go of all her unsatisfactory burdens when becoming associated with the internment camp. Jeanne came to terms that Manzanar was a part of her and she did not want to erase that part of her life. As quoted, “Having found it, I could say what you can only say when you’ve truly come to know a place: Farewell” (Houston

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