The Power Of Language In Julius Caesar

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The power of language Language, when used to manipulate, can solely cause war. Language can be used to manipulate others for the purpose of political change to the point of war. In Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare, the power of language is represented by the use of strong language by characters to persuade others to follow them. War is caused by the manipulation of the senators to kill Caesar and the manipulation of the plebeians to revolt. Cassius in act 1 shows how figurative language can strike emotion in the minds of people. In Act 3 Brutus and Antony reveal how the opinions of the masses can be changed with emotive language. Language used to change the minds of people reveals how man can cause tremendous events through the use of…show more content…
Cassius has proven physical superiority over Caesar but he once more uses the Metaphor of his weakness in power as a wretched creature to represent Caesar as a dictator to Brutus. When Cassius speaks to Casca to convince him to be a conspirator he states “Now could I, Casca, name to thee a man most like this dreadful night that thunders, lightens, opens graves, and roars as doth the lion in the Capitol.” (Shakespeare 1.3.73-76) Cassius uses metaphorical language to compare Caesar to a god, he uses the metaphor of a lion whose roar disrupts the entire capitol to show Casca that Caesar’s political might has risen to a Godly state has Rome has fallen into his hands. Lastly, in convincing Casca Cassius utters “And why should Caesar be a tyrant then? Poor man! I know he would not be a wolf But that he sees the Romans are but sheep. He were no lion were not Romans hinds. Those that with haste will make a mighty fire Begin it with weak straws.” (Shakespeare 1.3.104-108) Cassius uses metaphorical language here to show to Casca that it is of the fault of the Roman people that Caesar has become so godly. He compares the Plebeians to sheep and prey whilst Caesar is a wolf and lion easily feasting on their weak minds to fulfill his ambition…show more content…
These statements mixed with examples counteractive to Brutus’ argument create an antithesis that results in the plebeians not only doubting the argument of Brutus but beginning to believe that Caesar’s death was unjust. By restating the statements over and over again by to the point that the true intention of the conspirators is a rhetorical question for the plebeians. Antony’s use of this device not only affects the logos of the people by giving them a rhetorical question as to what is happening, but also affects their ethos by causing them to doubt the credibility of Brutus’ argument. Lastly, Antony begins to finish his speech and win the plebeians over by orating “.O masters, if I were disposed to stir your hearts and minds to mutiny and rage, I should do Brutus wrong, and Cassius wrong— who, you all know, are honorable men” (Shakespeare 3.2.120-123). Antony by turning Brutus and Cassius into villains. He sparked rage into the minds of the plebeians and then turned that rage against the conspirators by accusing them of being high and mighty against the emotions of the people. He states that he wishes not to go against the wishes of “honorable” men which has been proven at this point to be an ironic statement. Antony’s statement goes further to insight rage in the minds of the plebeians with the idea that to mourn their
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