Musth Essays

Sort By:
  • Good Essays

    In Sir Gawain and The Green Knight, the characteristics of the ideal knight is represented by King Arthur’s court. However, it will be challenged by The Green Knight as well as Bertilak’s court. Sir Gawain would reach a new understanding that ideals would eventually remain as ideals and that he is human, therefore it is perfectly fine to feel weak. The clashes between religion and chivalry that defines the ideal knight in King Arthur’s court. This is found in Fitt 2 where Sir Gawain reaches Sir

    • 869 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Hannah Edmiston Boudreau AP Language Friday 25 September, 2015 Shooting an Elephant Analyzing Rhetorical Devices Shooting an Elephant, written by George Orwell in 1936, describes his experience working as a British officer located in Moulmein, Burma. He writes his essay to reveal the cruelty and disastrous outcome of imperialism he witnesses. Orwell uses strong resource of language such as symbolism, metaphors and imagery to express his disdain for British imperialism. Orwell uses symbolism

    • 836 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The novel Monkey: Journey to the West is one of the greatest classics of Chinese literature. The novel follows the adventure of Tripitaka followed by the protagonist, monkey and his disciples to India in order to find ancient Buddhist scriptures. The story consists of Chinese legends, tales, and superstitions. Daoism, Confucianism, and Buddhism, which are the three main religions in China, play a huge role throughout this story. In the adaptation of Monkey: Journey to the West by David Kherdian,

    • 1015 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    “There are no facts, only interpretations” – a quote from Frederick Nietzsche which suggests there may be problems arriving at accurate conclusions regardless of how perfect physical sight is. By analyzing the short stories of “The Elephant in the Village of the Blind,” as well as “20/20” by Linda Brewer, the reader may find these very problems presented throughout the entirety of both texts. Both stories present a character whose perception of physical sight is slightly skewed, contrasted with a

    • 695 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    We all know that he shoots the elephant was because thousands of people were watching behind him and expects him to do what is ought to do. He does not shoot the elephant, the British empire would also be at loss to. Even more, he has struggled a lot not to be laughed at by the people of Burmese and in an instant, it would be a historical momentum for him if chose the elephant over his pride. The main purpose of the riffle bringing it with him was just a protection from the elephant that it might

    • 260 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    George Orwell and Thomas Jefferson explicitly express their dislike with British imperialism in their respective works Shooting an Elephant and The Declaration of Independence, yet Orwell and Jefferson have contrasting tactics and opinions in their writing. In Orwell’s autobiographical essay, he typically focuses on himself, but in Jefferson’s condemning piece, he focuses on the American people. The persuasive devices that they utilize give their writing a distinct emotion, and the persuasive devices

    • 427 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    George Orwell, is a very well know writer in the twentieth century, he began his writing career in 1934. Four years prior he had served five years as an imperial police officer, from these experiences he wrote on of his most famous essays, Shooting an Elephant. This essay is about him having to choose between shooting a “heated” elephant or leaving it be. He has the eyes of the Burma people watching him, and the crowd continues to grow. In the end he does end up shooting the elephant, but why? There

    • 636 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In the passages How to Tell a True War Story by Tim O’Brien and Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell, there are many similarities and differences between the two passages, but the differences exceed the similarities. While both sections talk about a shooter, human death, and animal death; they differentiate in the shooters motives, pacing, and narration structure. Just as How to Tell a True War Story has the death of Curt Lemon, Shooting an Elephant also has the death of the coolie. In Tim O’Brien’s

    • 947 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Quora defines social injustice as "the elimination of various human rights from a broad variance of unfair treatment that creates negative outcomes for a minority, aggregate, or underserved population." It has been said that George Orwell loved to look for people and organizations to wage verbal war with, that he had a tendency to blow small issues out of proportion, but is that what he is doing in his piece Shooting An Elephant? Orwell grew up in India and knew firsthand the struggles the Indian

    • 1198 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad provides an essential link between the strict Victorian expectations and the contrasting paradigm of a Modernist text. Conrad’s own experiences aboard a steamship that travelled to the Belgian Congo provided much of the insight and inspiration for Marlow’s quest in the novel. Many of Conrad’s real-life encounters are reflected in the novel through the eyes of Marlow. This overlap between reality and fiction will be examined throughout this essay. Furthermore, this

    • 1592 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Solutions to the elephant poaching crisis. Imagine this: Your on a safari traversing the Sahara while riding among a stunning elephant. As you all examine the majestic beast, all of a sudden, you hear a loud Bang. suddenly, you see a group of buggies surrounding the creature and your car.Though no incidents of such situations have been recorded, every day, according to the U.N, “around one hundred elephants are killed by poachers”, which poses a problem for the species. As the populations dwindle

    • 1009 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Both authors, Langston Hughes and George Orwell portrayed a sense of pressure and uneasiness from the crowds that watched on. The young Hughes felt ashamed of himself because technically everyone else has been saved (besides Westley). He began to feel overwhelmed as the church members looked at him confused and wondering why he was still on the mourners’ bench. The church made Hughes feel uncomfortable, the tension was too much for Hughes to handle so eventually he decided to, “ Lie, too, and say

    • 467 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In the story “Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell, there are many uses of literary devices. Orwell uses similes as key component throughout the story. Similes help the reader understand the tone and grasp what is actually occurring at a certain moment. For example, when the elephant took somebody`s life in the story, Orwell states,“The friction of the great beast's foot had stripped the skin from his back as neatly as one skins a rabbit” (Orwell 2). This simile gives the reader the impression

    • 325 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Novelist, Political writer and Journalist, George Orwell, in his autobiographical essay “Shooting an Elephant,” relays his experience as a police officer in colonial Burma. Orwell’s purpose is to reveal the fact that imperialism harms both the oppressed and the oppressor. He acquires a negative and penitent tone in order to voice out his thoughts, primarily to his British readers, regarding imperialism and how it ironically enslaved the British because of the expectations of the oppressed natives

    • 440 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    No matter how confident one may seem to be in his position or abilities, there always comes a point where he begins to waver and doubt his next move. As humans, it is inevitable that every question cannot be answered; not every response may be the most appropriate in a situation, however, it is not his faults nor follies that define him---unless he allows them to. In the case of the nameless narrator in George Orwell’s “Shooting an Elephant,” he is confined within British Burma’s imperialistic and

    • 645 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    When the government is involved, who is really in charge? Is it the government? Or is it the people, who have the control. Many examples have been shown that the people rule over the government. This can be seen in the story Shooting an Elephant. Where a police officer has every right to shoot an elephant who killed a man, but morally has conflict against doing so. There are three main themes or messages in this story, those are peer pressure, morality and action. First of all, this story has

    • 539 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The film, White Hunter, Black Heart expresses ambivalence regarding masculinity in relation to the “Great White Hunter” as the main character John Wilson, a “brilliant, screw-you all type filmmaker” is both idealized and undermined for his masculinity (White Hunter, Black Heart, 1990). During the time of the film, the early 1990’s, America was changing into a more modernized living and masculinity decreased as “white hunters became an endangered species” and feminism start to rise (Mayer 2002, 77)

    • 697 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Once imperialism started, these large and powerful countries began to realize the benefits of taking over weaker countries to exploit cheap labor and natural resources. Imperialism and colonization became a sign of supremacy and almost an unspoken measuring stick for these large and powerful countries. I 'm not sure you would exactly call the imperialists evil, but they were very greedy and primarily focused on attaining any resource available , by any means, to increase economic profitability

    • 399 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Analysis of George Orwell’s “Shooting an Elephant” The argument in George Orwell’s essay “Shooting an Elephant” is that imperialism can make a person go against their own beliefs in order to attain personal goals and authority. The essay discusses the evils of imperialism through Orwell’s experience with the oppressed people of Burma and his encounter with the elephant. Because of the fact that Orwell is a sub-divisional police officer in Burma he was able to establish a concrete and trustworthy

    • 838 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Reading Response “Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell is a story about what he went through when he was a policeman in Burma, and why he shot an elephant, “solely to avoid looking [like] a fool.” “[He] was hated by a large numbers of people,” and in a way tortured for things that he didn’t even understand what he was doing. He perceived that him and his other european cohorts were doing the right thing, but he also hated that fact that they were there. At first I assumed that this essay was

    • 429 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays