Oscar Wilde Essays

  • Ekphrasis And Aestheticism In Oscar Wilde

    1006 Words  | 5 Pages

    Ekphrasis and Aestheticism in Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray Oscar Wilde was a famous author and playwright, well known for both his literary works and the drama that surrounded his personal life. Born in Dublin in 1854, Wilde attended both Trinity College and Magdalen College, distinguishing himself early on as a classically talented individual. Upon graduation, he moved to London to pursue a literary career. With his charm and exuberance, he was quickly accepted into many prestigious

  • Oscar Wilde Fairy Tales Analysis

    2006 Words  | 9 Pages

    Breaking Away from Convention: “Death” in Oscar Wilde’s Fairy Tales Oscar Wilde is a representative writer of aestheticism in the 19th century, who has a high reputation in literary history. Although academic research on Wilde has been increasingly prevalent in recent years, his fairy tale works, The Happy Prince and Other Tales and A House of Pomegranates, have been largely ignored by scholars. With the development of research on Oscar Wilde 's fairy tales, some researchers (e.g., Hilary Fraser

  • The Importance Of Censorship In Catch 22 By Oscar Wilde

    2452 Words  | 10 Pages

    “The books that the world calls immoral are books that show its own shame”. The final passage from The Picture of Dorian Gray by controversial author Oscar Wilde. This is a thought provoking example of Wilde’s beliefs on censorship and self-realization. Wilde states that any book the world deems immoral, or inappropriate, is because the book reveals a shameful aspect of the world that people, and especially leaders, do not support or agree with, because it has the potential to spoil the righteous

  • Analysis Of The Picture Of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde

    1039 Words  | 5 Pages

    The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde (first published by Ward, Lock and Company in England in 1891). The Writer: Oscar Wilde (1854 – 1900) was an Irish writer who produced work in a variety of literary forms – mostly plays and essays. He was an aesthete, i.e., someone who emphasized beauty and form in literature and art. This was something that was reflected in his choice of themes, which demoted the social and political issues for the sake of the aesthetic, but also in his own style of life

  • Oscar Wilde Personality

    1759 Words  | 8 Pages

    Oscar Wilde was born on 16 October’ 1854 in Dublin. He was the second son of Sir William Wilde and Lady Wilde. Wilde’s father was a respected surgeon and his mother was a poet and an Irish nationalist who wrote under the pen name “Speranza”. Wilde was not close to his father but he respected him. But his relationship with his mother was one that was full of love and adoration. He was extremely close to her and respected her. Lady Wilde was a poet and she was known as "Speranza" in letters to

  • The Importance Of Censorship In The Picture Of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde

    2539 Words  | 11 Pages

    To Ban, Or Not To Ban “The books that the world calls immoral are books that show its own shame”. The final passage from The Picture of Dorian Gray by controversial author Oscar Wilde. This is a thought provoking example of Wilde’s beliefs on censorship and self-realization. Wilde states that any book the world deems immoral, or inappropriate, is because the book reveals a shameful aspect of the world that people, and especially leaders, do not support or agree with, because it has the potential

  • Oscar Wilde Morality

    1252 Words  | 6 Pages

    Morality is not a concern for Oscar Wilde and his characters. The lives of the characters throughout the novel are dictated by their authenticity. Whenever a character gives themselves over to artifice, they are rebuked for it soon after, regardless of how “good” or “bad” their actions may be. Wilde uses this novel as a cautionary tale for what can happen to a person when they abandon their own beliefs and natural impulses in favor of other’s opinions and affectation. Basil Hallward lives what

  • Fingal O Flahertie Willis Wilde's The Importance Of Being Earnest

    1494 Words  | 6 Pages

    Oscar Fingal O 'Flahertie Willis Wilde was born in 1854 in Dublin, Ireland. His father was a doctor and his mother was a revolutionary poet. Given his mother 's profession, Wilde was exposed to the arts at a very young age through conversations and interactions with his mother 's peers (PowerPoint). In addition, his mother often dressed him up as a child, developing a keen interest in aesthetics in Wilde. His interest in beauty and the arts led him to Trinity College, Dublin, where he won the Berkeley

  • Socratic Dialogue In Oscar Wilde's The Decay Of Lying

    1815 Words  | 8 Pages

    Lying” In Oscar Wilde’s 1889 essay, “The Decay of Lying,” Wilde makes an inflammatory and risky statement with his choice of form and style. The use of Socratic dialogue was a throwback to Plato’s time when art was truly valued and appreciated and social issues were not discussed by long, uneventful, and rather boring novels. Wilde speaks on a profound subject through this form because of his distaste with realism and his motivation to steer the focus of literature toward the Greek ideal. Oscar Wilde’s

  • Homosexual Love In Oscar Wilde's The Happy Prince

    795 Words  | 4 Pages

    Oscar Wilde’s quote“Be yourself, everyone else is already taken” seems to express the way he actually lived his life, a charming character who experienced both the pleasure and humiliation of society’s judgment. His intellect, brilliance and humanity shine through his short story”The Happy Prince”. Should we consider this fairytale as a simple story intended to be read to children? This question needs to be fully answered in order to have an idea of what Oscar Wilde really intends. He was humiliated

  • Analysis Of The Picture Of Dorian Gray

    1509 Words  | 7 Pages

    The Picture Of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde Oscar Wilde was born in Dublin,Ireland on October 16, 1854. He was educated in Trinity College in Dublin and Magdalen College.He married in 1884 with Constance Lloyd.Wilde published his only novel which is The Picture Of Dorian Gray ‘s 1st edition in 1890.Critics found that novel scandalous and immoral after that critic Oscar Wilde revised the novel in 1891 and he add six new chapter into novel . Wilde represent his philosophic and artistic ideas on the

  • Analysis Of The Picture Of Dorian Gray

    1630 Words  | 7 Pages

    through the passages of The Picture of Dorian Gray, and it has been passionately hypothesized that characters such as Basil, Dorian, and Lord Henry are personalities of Wilde’s own flamboyant character. In an interpretation written by Donald H Ericksen, Wilde had written the following: “Basil in how I see myself, Lord Henry how the world sees me and Dorian how I would like to be”. The discussions surrounding The Picture of Dorian Gray were linked to the egregious homoeroticism displayed through the synergy

  • Art And Criticism: The Aesthetic Movement

    1116 Words  | 5 Pages

    By the end of the Victorian age and the 19th century, a new critical movement headed by Oscar Wilde. The Aesthetical movement came as a reaction to prevailing utilitarian Victorian social philosophies. It argues that art and criticism as only cultivating the ennobling sensibility of beauty, therefore, art is superior to life and criticism is superior to art. However, this criticism is so much attacked and criticized. First of all, the Victorian society was extremely conservative.

  • Oscar Wilde Disobedience Analysis

    768 Words  | 4 Pages

    Oscar Wilde, Irish writer, theatrically said in 1891 that “progress has been made” because of “disobedience and... rebellion.” Furthermore, Wilde argues that disobedience is man's original virtue. Disobedience of law led to the American Revolution, desegregation, and improved civil rights across the board, proving that Wilde is correct. However, Wilde's claim ignores disobedience or the law that is regressive and detrimental to the health of the public, such as the Confederacy seceding for slavery

  • The Soul In Oscar Wilde's The Picture Of Dorian Gray

    933 Words  | 4 Pages

    The story of a soul “Nothing can cure the soul but the senses, just as nothing can cure the senses but the soul.” ― Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray Oscar Wilde was born in Dublin in Ireland. He studied in Oxford Magdalen College and graduated from there successfully. He joined to competition about poetry and composition in Oxford University and he won the prize of Newdigate. In 1881, his first poetry book was

  • Dorian Gray Symbolism

    882 Words  | 4 Pages

    Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray: The Lust for Our True Character The struggle to seem perfect on the outside is ever so present in today’s society. The desire to project an unrealistic version of ourselves, striving to mask our insecurities with layers of falsehood. The Victorian era is known for its beautiful women, art and architecture. Beneath the surface it is all false portrayals full of pretend actions and untruthful ideas in order to uphold their aestheticism. Victorian authors

  • The Picture Of Dorian Gray And The Beautiful And Damned

    1115 Words  | 5 Pages

    The researcher decides Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray and Fitzgerald’s The Beautiful and Damned to be the objects of the study on inferiority and superiority complex causing hedonistic lifestyle in main character. The first reason, both of literary works cover the changing of each life of the main character, society and ultimately the individual. Second, they both share the same social background of the main character in The Picture of Dorian Gray, Dorian, displays a well-respected young

  • Analysis Of Oscar Wilde's Aesthetic Movement

    804 Words  | 4 Pages

    Wilde was a budding author in his own lifetime, during Victorian era which early period was usually associated with 'prudishness ' and 'repression ' (Adams 3). Wilde was claimed to be a follower of the Aesthetic Movement which begs the question, what was he trying to imply in creating his novel? Wilde was not the leader of the Aesthetic movement but rather “a spokesman for the late 19th-century Aesthetic movement in England, which advocated art for art’s sake” (Luebering 133). Dorian’s story shows

  • The Picture Of Dorian Gray Character Analysis

    1857 Words  | 8 Pages

    “Every portrait that is painted with feeling is a portrait of the artist, not of the sitter” - Oscar Wilde. In other words, a quote from Oscar Wilde details his stance on art, a reflection he equates to his own work. For example, The Picture of Dorian Gray written by Oscar Wilde details the story of Dorian Gray, the one in question, undergoes the influence and corruption by his acquaintance Lord Henry which in turn leads to his eventual undoing. The novel details of a mystified painting created by

  • Analysis Of Oscar Wilde's The Picture Of Dorian Gray

    842 Words  | 4 Pages

    being’ can be found in Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray. In fact, the protagonist, Dorian Gray himself, is idealised by the painter Basil Hallward for his “simple and … beautiful nature” (Wilde, 16). He is a muse who inspires him with his “passion of the romantic spirit, […] and perfection of the spirit that is Greek” (Wilde, 12-3). He is also depicted as being “wonderfully handsome, with his finely-curved scarlet lips, his frank blue eyes, his crisp gold hair” (Wilde, 17) and holding a boyish