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Compare And Contrast Thomas Paine And The Declaration Of Independence

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During the 1760s and the 1770s, there was a major problem growing between the two countries: Great Britain and America. The founding fathers of America were in a confusing situation about the tension between the two countries and had to come up with something to do to solve the problem. The major problem at that time was how the colonists were getting treated by Great Britain, and regardless of whether the colonists should declare their independence from Britain. With the creation of Common Sense written by Thomas Paine and the Declaration of Independence written by Thomas Jefferson, both documents explain why America pushed to declare their independence from Britain. Many people say that Thomas Jefferson used no books, documents,…show more content…
On January 10, 1776 in Philadelphia, Thomas Paine creates his pamphlet Common Sense.. In his pamphlet, it explains about how he believes that the people should fight against the cruel King George III and the British Parliament. Paine had used simple common sense in writing his pamphlet to show the Colonists that they should fight back against Britain. The very first thing that Paine talked about in Common Sense was about how horrible King George III was, he basically attacked the king. The attack on the king was “viewed as shockingly insubordinate, Paine’s personal attack on the king was greeted as an apt response to this new provocation”.# In Common Sense it explains, “For all men being originally equaled, no one by birth could have the right to set up his own family in perpetual preference to all others forever”.# That statement, is a good statement because it tells people that even though people may not look the same, act the same, or speak the same language, everyone should be equally treated. Paine also meant to explain that the citizens and the great Britain government were all humans, so they should all be treated the same. Paine then goes on to discuss the evils of having a hereditary succession in
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