Comparing Women In Susan Glaspell's Trifles And A Doll House

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Research papers require a lot of critical thinking, planning, and research. First, one needs an interesting topic. Then, one needs at least one critical reading strategy to analyze the literary works in the topic. Finally, one needs to do preliminary research and write a basic thesis statement. After that, one has the beginning of a good research paper. The topic that I have chosen for my upcoming research paper is a comparison of the women in three literary works: Kate Chopin’s “The Story of an Hour,” Susan Glaspell’s Trifles, and Henrik Isben’s A Doll House. Specifically, I want to analyze the similarities between the five women—Louise Mallard, Minnie Wright, Mrs. Peters, Mrs. Hale, and Nora Helmer—such as their situations, motivations, and ultimately, the decisions at the end of their stories that stem from the same source: their society. I also want to compare the men in these stories, and how their similarities led to the stories’ outcomes just as much as the women’s. The decisions I am referring to are Louise’s death—which,…show more content…
Unsurprisingly, this article discusses the emotions in Kate Chopin’s “The Story of an Hour.” S.S. Jamil shows the irony in stereotyping women as overemotional, when the conventional roles Louise Mallard lives in force her to suppress her emotions. Jamil suggests that this is the cause of Louise’s heart trouble, since psychological health does affect physical health. The self-assertion that Louise discovers is permission to be herself, since emotions are a substantial part of who we are. The narrative of this article paints Louise as the victim and society as the culprit. Jamil references Brently Mallard as a pawn of society. She also indicates that Louise’s death was a conscious choice, not an accident. The article’s list of references is impressive, but a little dated. It does not have references for further research. It is a sound analysis of Louise and her motives, and it integrates perfectly with the other sources I have

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