Conflicts In The Crucible

662 Words3 Pages
100% trials begin in conflict. Such is the case in The Crucible, a play by Arthur Miller, which depicts the Salem Witch Trials of 1692. The play opens to Rev. Samuel Parris, his niece, Abigail Williams, and his comatose daughter, Betty Parris. Several other people come in to see how Betty is, including Ann Putnam, a mother of one living, but sick, child, Ruth Putnam, and seven dead children, and John Proctor, the rebel who is having an affair with Abigail Williams. Ann Putnam struggles with the death of seven of her children. Proctor struggles against the society supporting the trials and his servant, Mary Warren. These conflicts are necessary to move the trials along, each having an effect on the final scene, John Proctor being taken to be…show more content…
You will tell it in the court,
Mary Warren: I cannot” (Miller, 80)
In this conversation, Mary Warren and John Proctor are at odds because Mary is scared and unwilling to testify, but Proctor is forcing her to do so. He does not want to testify, but if Mary testifies, saying the same thing, Proctor does not have to. Mary’s testimony ensues a series of events at the courthouse, ending with the everyone outside in a panic, and Mary, more scared of Abigail than Proctor now, accuses Proctor of witchcraft. If Mary and Proctor has not fought, she would not have testified, these events would not have happened, Proctor would not be accused, and the idea that the accusations were false would not have been placed in the Judge’s head. Each conflict has built upon each other, Ann Putnam vs. Death begins the trials with the first mention of witchcraft. John Proctor vs. the town fuels the interpersonal conflict with Mary. Mary Warren vs. John Proctor causes Mary to accuse him of witchcraft, leading to the final scene where Proctor is taken to be hung. Each conflict is necessary to cause the next and the next, without which there would be no play. Let this be a lesson to all to think of other’s perspectives and their own
Open Document