Eli Wiesel Acceptance Speech

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According to Google, the definition of suffering is the state of undergoing pain distress or hardship. When others are suffering and we look away, we automatically take the side of the tormentor. During Hitler's reign many Jews suffered but no one said anything. Now Eli Wiesel who endured extreme suffering tells readers everywhere of the importance of speaking out when humans are suffering.
At the time of Hitler's reign six million Jews died and even more suffered, yet the world remained silent. Six million lives could have been saved by simply speaking out against these tormentors. Eli feels strong about this subject and says, "Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor never the tormented"(Wiesel Acceptance Speech, pg 1). This helps the reader realize if society doesn't speak it takes the side of the tormentor. Furthermore, not speaking out makes the tormentors think they can continue to get away with causing human suffering. Additionally, not speaking up makes the victims feel weak Eli says, "we felt abandoned, forgotten. All of us did"(Wiesel Perils, pg 2).This illustrates that not speaking out takes
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For example Eli says, "those who keep silent yesterday will keep quiet tomorrow"(Wiesel , Night pg 16).This shows the reader if you do not speak up now, you will never speak up. To go on, he explains if you fail to use your voice, you will never find it. In addition if we neglect to raise our voices it will affect the victims who came before us by tarnishing their memories. Eli went on to state, "to forget the dead would be akin to killing them a second time" (Wiesel, Night pg 21). This illustrates that not spreading the word of the injustice that was done to these people is like killing their spirit. Furthermore not talking about the event makes the event seem like it never occurred. Injustice affects us and the people that came before
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