Rhetorical Devices In Jfk Inaugural Address

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President Trump and President JFK both used rhetorical devices in their inaugural addresses to help emphasize the importance of their perspectives and ideas. The two Presidents both used these common rhetorical devices in their inaugural addresses to persuade their audiences. These rhetorical devices have been used for years to persuade or strengthen their ideas. JFK used repetition and charged language in his inaugural address all the way back in 1961. When the United States's problems were war with Soviet Union and nuclear problem scares. JFK used these rhetorical devices to instill confidence and inspire the people of the United States. President Trump used these rhetorical devices recently in 2017. When the United States' biggest problems …show more content…

This quote shows charged language by using aggressive words like war, disciplined, hard, and bitter peace. These words show that the future holds some challenges ahead, but nothing that Americans can't handle. The next piece of evidence in President JFK’s inaugural address shows repetition: he says, “Let both sides…” (JFK 16-20). He starts paragraphs 16-19 with “Let both sides…” and says “Let both sides…” in the middle of paragraph 20. He keeps saying, “Let both sides…” to tell the audience that there is good in other countries, not just the United States. He’s showing that there is good in other countries and that he plans to establish relations with other …show more content…

In the first example of rhetorical devices shown in President Trump's inaugural address, he uses charged language by saying, “Mothers and children trapped in poverty in our inner cities; rusted-out factories scattered like tombstones across the landscape of our nation; an education system, flush with cash, but which leaves our young and beautiful students deprived of all knowledge; and the crime and the gangs and the drugs that have stolen too many lives and robbed our country of so much unrealized potential” (Trump 8). He uses charged language to show the problems that families in poverty go through. He wants to show the audience how big of a problem this is and the consequences it leads to. This is just one problem he shows he wants to get rid of while he is the president of our country. The last quote that shows one of these rhetorical devices is in President Trump's address, where he says, “We assembled here today, are issuing a new decree to be heard in every city, in every foreign capital, and in every hall of power” (Trump 13). Trump keeps saying “every…” to show the importance of this new idea. He wants this to be known everywhere. He wants to show the new authority that the U.S. has. He's showing the audience the hopefulness they should have now with him as their

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