Situational Irony In Shirley Jackson's The Storm And The Lottery

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In the ironic plot twist of a conclusion, “The Storm” by Kate Chopin and “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson demonstrates a similar case in terms of situational irony by concluding the story with an unusual reaction after partaking in a behavior that does not conform to generally accepted standards of the behavior of a “normal” society. Within the setting of “The Lottery” as part of their “normal” society by which some of the other towns have already ceased, the drawing of the lottery. One town in particular however continues to gather in the square to conduct the deep-rooted, ghastly tradition, which has always been a tradition they do not dare to question or change in the slightest including the box used for holding the name of the villagers despite its timeworn appearance. “Mr. Summers spoke frequently to the villagers about making a new box, but no one liked to upset even as much tradition as was represented by the black box. Although well along the villagers had forgotten the ritual and replaced the original black box, they still remembered to use stones.” (Jackson 1) This quotation, reveals that the villagers have no actual…show more content…
“The morning of June 27th was clear and sunny, with the fresh warmth of a full-summer day; the flowers were blossoming profusely and the grass was richly green. The people of the village began to gather… The children assembled first, broke into boisterous play and their talk was still of the classroom and the teacher, of books and reprimands. Bobby Martin had already stuffed his pockets full of stones, and the other boys soon followed his example, selecting the smoothest and roundest stones.” This quote precisely displays the vivid, exuberant details that

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