Sonnet 18 And 130 Analysis

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William Shakespeare is one of the well-known English-speaking poets, whose contribution to the world literature is impressive. Shakespeare was able to add his innovation into the writing style while and making it unique and special. Meanwhile, Shakespeare paid great attention to love as an important subject of his poems. His vague language and impression helped in seeing love from dissimilar views while presenting the variability of its nature. The love and passion have always been Shakespeare’s most interests, but he was able to see its tragic and poetic side. Shakespeare contributed 37 plays, 154 sonnets, and two long poems to English literature. Two of the most famous and distinguished sonnets, on of the forms of Shakespearean writing styles,…show more content…
Sonnet 18, has an insulting and criticizing quality in the beginning while sonnet 130 uses different phrases and structures to imply the passion to his lover. For instance, the sonnet 130 could be discovered as romantic, serious, and insulting at the same time, also Shakespeare reflects the misleading nature of love by referring to “I think my love as rare”. On the other hand, the author underlines his fascination to his mistress: “I think my love as rare, as any she belied with false compare”, and these two lines add to the concluding point of the poem and also highlighting the presence of attraction. Sequentially, sonnet 18 has a humorous tone and starts the sonnet with the rhetorical question “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?” However, even with the presence of this odd phrase, in the beginning, eventually toward the end the sincerity and seriousness inclined to lead in the emotional expression. Although both sonnets cover the same, they use different figurative language instruments to deliver the right tone and the attitude of the author, and this aspect is what distinguishes the poems from one another while making them reflect the love and passion from opposite

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