The Great Gatsby Response

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“You Fell For the Okie Doke!” All problems in life must eventually come to a conclusion, but the people in life can help decide more precisely when. In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, various significant events occurred at four o’clock. When Gatsby met Daisy for tea at Nick’s house, Gatsby’s extraordinary attempts to attract Daisy were no longer necessary, as he had finally gotten her attention. When Daisy closed her window to Gatsby on the night of Myrtle’s death, she did not express any more passion toward him, indicating that their love had expired. George Wilson murdered Gatsby at four o’clock, ending the life of a man full of passion and the American dream. The resolution of many life events in The Great Gatsby occurred at…show more content…
Since Gatsby was given the blame for the murder or Myrtle, he had to accept the consequences. George was extremely distraught after his wife was killed, and was motivated to seek revenge on whoever killed her. When George went to Tom’s house to ask who the murderer was, Tom told him it was Gatsby. With revolver in hand, George went straight to Gatsby’s house. Nick described the setting by saying, “The chauffeur- he was one of Wolfsheim’s protégés- heard the shots- afterward he could only say that he hadn 't thought anything much about them” (161). While Gatsby swam in his pool, Gatsby was shot and killed by George Wilson, who then walked into the bushes and killed himself. Gatsby had truly loved Daisy, whereas, Daisy did not love him back. Daisy had turned off the green light in her life for Gatsby due to the incident of Myrtle Wilson’s death. Gatsby was full of passion and was an extremely generous man. He threw parties, that had a series of men and women of whom, would drink his alcohol and stay in his house. He never started fights with anyone, and preferred pleasing others. Nick analyzed that once Gatsby was gone, all the problems in West Egg has ceased. Nick reminisced by saying, “I spent my Saturday nights in New York, because those gleaming, dazzling parties of his were with me so vividly that I could still hear the music and the laughter, faint and incessant, from his garden, and the cars going up and down his drive” (179). Gatsby’s character as an extravagant and divine man had now become a keen memory for Nick. Gatsby’s willingness to protect Daisy and his affection for her had him killed, ending the life of a loving and passionate man at four o’clock in the
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