The Influence Of Slaves On The Underground Railroad

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The Underground Railroad was a system of abolitionists that assisted runaway slaves on their path to freedom. The Underground railroad was started by abolitionist and former slave, Harriet Tubman. Once Tubman obtained her freedom, she decided to go back into slave states and help other slaves achieve freedom. On the railroad were conductors, or people that aided slaves on the railroad by providing them shelter and safety. Abolitionists, such as William Lloyd Garrison and Frederick Douglass, wrote about the Underground Railroad and spread awareness of the hardships slaves face. Many different people helped on the underground railroad including Harriet Tubman, conductors, and abolitionists. Harriet Tubman was born into slavery in Dorchester…show more content…
After the Fugitive Slave act was passed in 1850, it became even more dangerous to help runaway slaves. If a conductor was caught helping a slave they could be, “fined, imprisoned, branded, or even hanged,” (eiu.edu.) The conductors were people of different race, religion, occupation, and status. Some were escaped slaves that returned to slave territory to help free others. Many conductors hid fugitive slaves in their homes and businesses. Safe houses on the underground railroad were called stations and a lantern would hang outside of every station. Conductors helped the slaves because, “believed in a cause greater than themselves, which was the freeing of thousands of enslaved human beings,” (eiu.edu.) Conductors were a big help on the Underground…show more content…
They also helped fund Harriet Tubman’s trips to free more slaves. William Lloyd Garrison and Lewis and Arthur Tappan started the abolition movement when they formed the American Anti-Slavery Society, “The organization created the Declaration of Anti-Slavery in which they gave reasons for the construction of the society and its goals,” (eiu.edu.) Frederick Douglass, who was an escaped slave, was another important abolitionist. He published two papers both about the abolition of slavery and his goals. He also made public speeches to inform people of abolitionists concerns. Sojourner Truth was also an escaped slave who made speeches about anti-slavery. She talked about being a slave as well as a women. Truth, “was not an active participant in the Underground Railroad but she did assist by helping slaves find new homes,” (eiu.edu.) Abolitionist may not have been active participants in the Underground Railroad, but they did a lot to end slavery and raise
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