What Are The Great Gatsby Daisy's Character Flaws

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In the story The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, the majority of the characters are either dishonest, chasing hollow dreams, or plain ignorant. Fitzgerald flaunts the flaws of these characters regularly. Tom Buchanan is a constant example of dishonesty, due to his reoccurring affair with Myrtle Wilson. Although she does not believe it true, Daisy is one of the most ignorant characters. However, although these character defects are greatly emphasized throughout the story, none are more frequently emphasized than those of Gatsby. In the majority of the chapters, certain aspects of Gatsby’s flawed personality are highlighted, the most important of which is his almost blind pursuit of Daisy Buchanan. Gatsby obsesses over Daisy and dedicates…show more content…
At the peak of Gatsby’s life, when he reconnects with Daisy, the green light changes: “Now it was again a green light on a dock. His count of enchanted objects had diminished by one.” (93) The green light is a real tangible object that represents Gatsby’s sheer desire for Daisy. Gatsby also uses his extreme wealth to lure daisy in the form of extravagant parties. Gatsby hosts extravagant parties in an effort not only to boost his social status, but also to look for Daisy. Many wealthy, and often wild people attend these large social events held by Mr. Gatsby. Some of the guests even come lacking an invitation, “Sometimes they came and went without having met Gatsby at all, came for the party with a simplicity of heart that was its own ticket of admission.” (41) The people coming and going is testament to the sheer size and prominence of the parties. Gatsby not only uses the festivities in an effort to directly lure Daisy, but also to demonstrate to her and everyone else his massive accumulation of wealth. As a result of his parties growing in popularity, more and more respectable people attend, information that Gatsby uses to his full advantage when he finally meets with
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