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Liberal arts Essays

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    Has the liberal arts education route become the Penicillin of the higher education realm? Proceeding from redundancy, this presupposed broad-spectrum choice of study has been around for quite some time. Potentially, it can be inferred that the liberal arts have been around at least since the days of Plato, who so eloquently promoted his humble yet satirical opinion of government. Perhaps, this was the genesis of the liberalists. Despite its perceived ostensible success, the liberal arts have indubitably

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    this self-assessment is to evaluate the growth of my knowledge, skills, and values of the Ottawa University learning outcomes for Liberal Arts Studies. This will occur through reflecting on my understanding of a liberal arts education and my learning in each breadth area. This will also entail references to the current course (LAS 45012 Global Issues in the Liberal Arts) and life experiences that have contributed to my learning and growth in each area. The conclusion will involve an elucidation

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    Liberal Arts Education

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    to pursue a liberal arts education or a vocational one. A liberal arts education primarily includes a collection of different classes and topics students can choose to take and study. A vocational route will mainly educate students on their specific intended career. Each method of education can be argued for and against. In Sanford J. Ungar’s essay, “The New Liberal Arts”, his argument supports a liberal arts education. He gives the reader examples of misperceptions of a liberal arts

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    value of a liberal arts education, he instead expresses what a liberal arts education means to him. Rather than a liberal arts education teaching students how to think for themselves—which is now common belief—Wallace instead expresses that a liberal arts education teaches students to exercise control over how and what to think. To clarify, he explains, “it means being conscious and aware enough to choose what you pay attention to and

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    “Why, then, do we educate our children in the liberal studies? It is not because they can bestow virtue, but because they prepare the soul for the reception of virtue” in the text “liberal studies and education” by Seneca, this quote illustrates Seneca’s beliefs in that liberal studies are not the path to virtue in fact he believes that the path to virtue is seen through wisdom. The effects of virtue through wisdom are illustrated in the text through the characteristics of loyalty, kindliness and

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    Not For Hines Analysis

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    abilities, and career preparation, not moral improvement or only academic knowledge. The first main goal of education should be to produce democratic citizens who critically think. If the arts and humanities continue to be undervalued, Martha Nussbaum, author of Not For

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    I have always enjoyed a good challenge. Whether it be physical or mental in nature, I always enjoy the feeling of being challenged; I think growing up closely with my two brothers helped to cement that attribute. The feeling of having a metaphorical fire lit underneath my feet fills me with deep feelings of resolve and desire, which I then choose to mix with a healthy dose of pragmatism. That last ingredient in my interior motivations, I believe, is the most overlooked in many others who share my

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    really see the meaning behind it. It was also inferred that he would have to go to college and buckle down, which meant premed, prelaw, or major and business. None of those options interested him so he defaulted into the unconventional territory of liberal arts and majored in English. All through college reading seemed painfully difficult and alien to Graff, all the “great book” that he supposedly could “connected” with failed to do so. It was not until

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    Is a Liberal Arts Education for everyone? There have been debates over whether or not a liberal arts education helps college students. A Liberal Education is defined as “an approach to learning that empowers individuals and prepares them to deal with complexity, diversity, and change” by the Association of American Colleges and Universities. In “The New Liberal Arts” by Sanford Ungar, and “Are too many people going to college?” by Charles Murray both men discuss common questions that high school

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    Being exposed to broad knowledge which provokes lifelong learning, students from Liberal Arts Colleges can easily change occupations later on in life after college. Michael Roth claims that although vocational education might seem more pragmatic and reasonable because it offers graduates a job which they already know how to do and guarantees them a high starting salary, it does not teach them the needed skills which apply to more than one field of work. Furthermore, focusing on only one profession

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    “What is this modern wish-wash of a Liberal Arts education?” “Studying all subjects? Bah! A Jack of all and Master of none! That is what our child will become!” “A complete wastage of time! After all, the phrase itself has the word ‘Arts’ in it.” This is an essence of how most parents, teachers and even

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    A liberal arts education teaches arts, sciences, and humanities, which results in many people having their opinions on the value of having a liberal arts degree. Some college students believe that following their career track is the only way to be successful, as opposed to going to a vocational school or pursuing a career in liberal arts. On the other hand, some students feel that pursuing a liberal arts degree can not only make them successful in their career, but educate them on how to communicate

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    Liberal Arts Education (Liberal Arts Education is a term referred to subjects of study that develop students’ general knowledge and ability to think, rather than their technical skills according to the Oxford English Dictionary) is not an unfamiliar word to Chinese people (lived in Mainland China) with the great progress in Chinese education now. The exploration of the development of Liberal Arts Education in a China (China here politically refers to Mainland China) context will be the theme of this

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    Liberal Arts Vs Education

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    Liberal arts education has evolved throughout time. Many individuals have written on their views for education for their time showing the evolution of the liberal arts. The two authors I will be referring to in this paper is Martha Nussbaum and Aurelius Augustinus. By examining both authors we can see the evolution while still seeing the ideals that have withstood the test of times. These two authors where expressing their ideas in drastically different time periods, yet they still express similar

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    Having never taken a college writing course before, I did not know what to expect and therefore assumed that I would choose my own topic to write about; of course, this isn’t the case. However, if I had the choice, I would not have chosen to write a response to Gerald Graff’s “Hidden Intellectualism”. After going through his essay with a fine-tooth comb, I have found a few flaws in his reasoning. Gerald Graff believes that schools and colleges are not taking advantage of “street smarts” by not using

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    who believes colleges should have a more liberal approach towards its classes and have students actually learn a broad range of real life skills instead of just going into a career just because it pays well. In Ungar’s essay he explains the misperception that Americans have on obtaining a liberal-arts degree and how they believe it doesn’t translate well to the real world. Despite Ungar’s points Murray’s essay touched on many valid points such as a liberal education should be learned

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    Liberal arts education, or academic courses that are intended to gain wide variety of knowledge including humanities, social sciences and natural sciences, is in the difficult times. Some criticize it due to its expensive tuition and contents of education. These critics have often referred to liberal arts as “luxury for the rich” or “impractical academic disciplines” (Pascarella et al. 6). Nevertheless, liberal arts education seems to be better when compared to professional education in terms of

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    New Liberal Arts,” Sanford J. Ungar explains the common misperceptions people form about a liberal arts education; he also explains his reasoning and viewpoints toward it. In fact, a liberal arts education provides multiple benefits. Benefits such as job security and job opportunities result from this type of education. Therefore, a liberal arts education enhances a student’s vocational success. Liberal arts colleges instill character traits in their students that employers desire. Liberal arts

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    Importance of Liberal Arts Education Liberal arts education gives the opportunity to learn from different sectors not restricting the students within one discipline. By engaging students in different activities which deal with culture and humanities, liberal arts education inspires them to think critically, to solve the problems of the society they live in. Liberal arts education creates quality graduates who can think and write. Sigurdson explains the importance of liberal arts in his article, “Why

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    The Harlem Migration

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    most successful way to integrate into the white world was to count on a selected few, the “Talented Tenth”. A group of “highly educated black men” who would write about respectable black people in order to make the white world accept them. Therefore, art had to be

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