Middle-earth Essays

  • Middle Earth Bank

    1491 Words  | 6 Pages

    Reforms to be implemented on the Middle Earth Bank: A study of preventative measures for collapsing of banks Introduction A bank is financial institution approved by governments to make investments, give out loans, help to reduce imperfections in international markets as an intermediary in financial transaction and provide other financial services to its customers (Emily,Hill,Hussain,&Nixon, 2014). These financial institutions take various forms but these various forms broadly fall under or can

  • Middle Earth Bank Case Study

    1383 Words  | 6 Pages

    1. Introduction The Middle Earth Bank was situated in Hobbiton, and it used a flexible management principle that allowed an employee to be appointed for more than one position simultaneously. As any other bank, its aim was to make profit off buying shares on one market and immediately trading on the other market and other related financial activities. The bank had as its head trader, Bilbo, who was simultaneously the floor manager for the Bank's trading on the Stock Exchange, and the unit's head

  • Tolkien's Private Life In The Lord Of The Rings

    1694 Words  | 7 Pages

    book trilogy The Lord of the Rings is one of the most read books of all time and it is said to be the foundation of the Fantasy genre. 1:1 Aim The aim of this essay is to analyze whether or not the story of The Lord of the Rings and its setting Middle-earth can be connected to Tolkien's own private life, how his experiences may reflect upon the events and environments he describes in his storytelling, and what hidden meanings can be found in the books. 1:2 Method To write this essay, various sources

  • The Silmarillion Book Report

    797 Words  | 4 Pages

    The Silmarillion, is a fiction book in Middle Earth and the book that sets the stage for J.R.R. Tolkien’s well known books The Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings Trilogy. The Silmarillion is a book with a similar storyline with the Bible in the creation of Arda, two characters that show the evil and good in this book, and a rich storyline the gives the background for J.R.R. Tolkien’s other books. In the beginning was Arda, it was created by Euris Iluvatar. Iluvatar created the Valar, who was originally

  • Inequality In Lord Of The Rings Gender Roles

    1510 Words  | 7 Pages

    set out on a journey to Mount Doom to destroy the One Ring and the dark lord Sauron. Together they form the Fellowship of the Ring, a brotherhood form with members of the various Free People of Middle Earth. We encounter a mystical world filled with wizards, dwarves, elves and a rare race of Middle Earth called “hobbits”. In Tolkien’s world of mystery, the majority of the population is male. The trilogy has only three significant

  • Gandaulf's Journey In The Hobbit

    914 Words  | 4 Pages

    For example, Gandalf could use his power to give glory to himself, but he choses to help others such as Thorin and company on their quest to regain their homeland and treasure from Smaug. Gandalf is considered one of the greatest wizards in Middle Earth because he is the most unselfish and good-hearted wizard. In The Lord of The Rings, Gandalf sacrifices himself for the company and as a result is transformed from Gandalf the Grey to Gandalf the White, a more pure and powerful version of himself

  • Lost Soul Archetypes In Lord Of The Rings

    1563 Words  | 7 Pages

    There are multiple patterns in this world, and as people go through life and experience things that the majority of humans do, mankind adheres to many of them. These templates are called archetypes, and we notice multitudes of them portrayed in novels or film. By looking at the Lord of the Rings: the Two Towers directed by Peter Jackson, one can see that the film follows character and symbolic patterns that have stayed constant through millions of years, two of which are the lost soul archetype,

  • The Hobbit Language Analysis

    776 Words  | 4 Pages

    beginning of a culture rather than only a product of it. Tolkien wrote that “The invention of languages is the foundation,” the ‘stories’ were made rather to fit the notion of the languages than the reverse.” In Lord of the Rings, Tolkien created Middle-earth as a world for his invented language [...]. Each invented language in his works plays an important role in the evolution of events and development of the characters in the story. Language and literature go hand in hand, however it is important

  • Allusions In Lord Of The Flies

    1660 Words  | 7 Pages

    In the Lord of the Rings trilogy, J.R.R. Tolkien creates a fantasy world, Middle-Earth. His books are based off stories he told himself during his youth. He invented a new language called Elvish, and many other magical elements like the magic invisible ring. J.R.R. Tolkien writes about the journey of a hobbit named Frodo. Frodo’s job is to destroy the Ring before Sauron, Lord of the Rings, who created it, can find it again (Yates). Tolkien creates a mythic world full of allusion and conflict to illustrate

  • Bilbo Baggins Theme

    1212 Words  | 5 Pages

    sideways? Impossible! Go forward? Only thing to do! On we go!” ― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit The Hobbit is a fantasy novel by J.R.R. Tolkien, which takes place in the third age of Middle-Earth, 2941-2942. The main protagonist, Bilbo Baggins, along with the wizard Gandalf and thirteen dwarves, travel across Middle-Earth on an expedition to reclaim Lonely Mountain. They experience many catastrophes and bumps on the road along the way, but they continue to move along. The story focuses on the themes

  • The Hobbit Literary Analysis Essay

    663 Words  | 3 Pages

    The Hobbit Literary Analysis Would you be able to step out of your comfort zone for the sake of adventure and a promise of treasure? This was the predicament Bilbo Baggins is unexpectedly presented with one sunny afternoon. Thirteen dwarves appear at his door and put forward their offer. Bilbo is a little apprehensive at first but soon comes to the realization that in his ordinary life of a Hobbit in the Shire he will never get another opportunity like this again. When reading The Hobbit, being

  • Examples Of Bilbo's Transformation In The Hobbit

    987 Words  | 4 Pages

    in the ground, there lived a hobbit (Tolkien 1.1).” English author J.R.R Tolkien first wrote down those words over 60 years ago, which became the beginning of the allegorical classic, The Hobbit. The Hobbit takes place in a fantasy world called “Middle Earth” and tells the story of a hobbit named Bilbo Baggins. Throughout the story, Bilbo changes as a character; from the protagonist to the hero. Many literary devices are used throughout The Hobbit that add humour, suspense, and/or affect the characters

  • Religious Symbolism In Lord Of The Flies

    2395 Words  | 10 Pages

    In order to build a case around this theory, one must understand how religion impacted Tolkien’s life. Through exploring Tolkien’s life, we find that he was a devout Catholic. In an essay by Alina Corday titled Master of Middle Earth, Corday talks about Tolkien’s life by giving the reader a timeline of historical events which influenced the young author. Tolkien began his life in Africa. But after the sudden passing of his father, his mother packed the family up and moved to

  • Similarities Between The Hobbit And The Hero's Journey

    872 Words  | 4 Pages

    the main character in becoming a hero in literature;much like how J.R.R Tolkien and Eric Greitens used The Hero’s Journey in their books A Warrior 's Heart(Eric Greitens) and The Hobbit(J.R.R Tolkien). The Hobbit, a fantasy book, takes place on Middle Earth and follows Mr. Bilbo Baggins as he adventures off with 13 dwarves and a wizard to defeat the dreaded dragon Smaug that stole the dwarves’ ancestors gold and set fire to the town of Dale. Much different to The Hobbit, A Warrior 's heart follows

  • The Two Towers Archetypes Analysis

    909 Words  | 4 Pages

    An archetype is present in every society and culture. Familiar characters, symbols, and situations are used in film to convey basic human experiences that will resonate with the viewer. Archetypes send an understandable message to viewers as to the details of a character or scene. Whether the viewers realize it or not, they will have interpreted what is being conveyed without even thinking about the insertion of archetypes. In his film The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, J.R.R. Tolkien incorporates

  • The Fellowship Of The Rings Analysis

    867 Words  | 4 Pages

    learns that the Ring is very powerful, he decides to leave to learn about how to destroy it. He originally leaves alone but then travels with his friends Sam, Merry, and Pippin. Together, they journey beyond the Shire to far off lands such as Bree, Middle-Earth, Ithilien, and finally Mount Doom (also known by Orodruin). When Frodo and Sam finally reach the summit of Orodruin, the most decrepit former owner of the ring, Gollum, would leap for Frodo to bite off his finger and possess the ring one last time

  • Bilbo's Journey In The Hobbit

    1606 Words  | 7 Pages

    desires you never knew you had? For Bilbo Baggins of Bagend, this rings true. J.R.R Tolkien's novel, The Hobbit, follows the adventures of Bilbo and Co. through the Hero’s Journey in the extraordinary world of Middle Earth. It was a beautiful spring day in the Shire, and Bilbo was in the middle of his second breakfast when a wizard showed up at his doorstep. Though he did not know it at the time, Bilbo was in for the adventure of a lifetime. The wizard revealed himself to be Gandalf the Gray a well-known

  • The Hobbit Journey Analysis

    858 Words  | 4 Pages

    The Hobbit; A Most Unexpected Journey In a hobbit hole, in The Hill, in Hobbiton, in the Shire, in Middle-Earth, sat a hobbit named Bilbo. Bilbo started off a safe hobbit, unknowing of the adventures that lay ahead of him. One afternoon, twelve hobbits and a wizard came over for a party that he didn’t know about. Two years later, he had outwitted a slimy creature, battled giant spiders, earned a share of a mountain full of treasure, and learned more than anyone in Hobbiton could teach him. He

  • The Hobbit Analysis Essay

    1527 Words  | 7 Pages

    The Hobbit Genre Analysis Essay The Hobbit is an energizing dream about a hobbit that goes on the most phenomenal experience of his life. Bilbo (hobbit) goes to Middle Earth to look for the departed fortune. The plot of this eminent dream fits the 'journey ' design from the earliest starting point, the distance to the end. These are the components required to having the ideal mission, and The Hobbit contains every one of these components. Therefore, The Hobbit is a very good example of a monomyth

  • The Lord Of The Rings Trilogy Analysis

    2250 Words  | 9 Pages

    at this point. We recognize The Ring at the “call to adventure” stage. Main character is usually called to adventure by an outside person, an object or an event according to Campbell’s monomyth theory. The Ring is the source of all evil in the middle earth, which accidentally has fallen into hands of Frodo’s uncle, Bilbo Baggins. After some events which seem to be by coincidences, The Ring has chosen Frodo to be it’s carrier. And we realise that, all events which happens, like The Ring choosing the