Adamgopnik's 'Bread And Women'

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Two women are the most important in a grown man’s life, his wife and his mother. Adam Gopnik, New York University, Institute of Fine Arts graduate and a long time writer for The New Yorker explores his relationship to these women in his article “Bread and Women” (AdamGopnik.com). Gopnik describes how his sojourn into bread baking uncovered insights about his mother and spouse. He utilizes allusions, epithets, and dialogue to portray his wife and mother as important individuals who are unique and interesting in their own rights. Gopnik uses allusions to ancient buildings and famous figures to clarify the complex personalities of his beloved muses. Allusions appear in the personal story often. Martha, the author’s wife, is described to not be…show more content…
During a telephone call to his mother to ask her for help baking bread she replies, “It’s so funny you called. I’m just working on a new series of water-buffalo-milk ice creams. You’d love trying them. Do come for a visit as soon as you can. I’ll show you how to bake anything in the world you like.” Her matter-of-fact way of saying she was making “water-buffalo-milk ice creams” evokes a feeling that she is not afraid to cook and try strange, new foods. Notably, she also does not hesitate to invite her son over to cook to show him hot to “bake anything in the world”. Obviously, Gopnik’s mother is someone who is well traveled or at least is has significantly more time than the average person into baking. Her eccentricities continue to show through her speech when she tells Gopnik of her new creation in the kitchen. Speaking on her new dessert she exclaims, “Oh that’s my broissant, It’s my own invention. It’s brioche dough given a croissant treatment—egg dough with butter folded in layers.” Not only does Gopnik illustrate that she can bake well, he’s showing that his mother is creative enough to invent a brand new dessert. Gopnik’s wife also interjects with some dialogue in this personal story. Towards the beginning of the story, Gopnik asks his wife a question, “when did you bake bread?” While the question seemed simple enough, Martha’s response, “When I was…show more content…
His use of allusions, epithets and dialogue work together to paint these two complex women. Gopnik’s writing helps us understand these two women more deeply and give us a sense of how uncommon and multi-layered they
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