Comparing Anthem And Plato's Allegory Of The Cave

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Adam Choquette Period 7 Mr. Coulter Honors English II March 3, 2016 Breaking Man’s Chains In the last chapter of Anthem, Equality reflects, “The best in me had been my sins and my transgressions”(98). He no longer holds the belief that society is simply ‘misguided’ or that they are ‘forgiving’. Instead, Prometheus embraces individuality, rejecting the concept that, “We are all in all and all in one” held by his former society (19). “I am done with this creed of corruption,” Equality declares, no longer willing to slave for his brothers (97). It is this declaration of independence which breaks Equality’s chains allowing him to rejoice in his ‘sins’. Writing allows man to individually express and spread his ideas rapidly and eternally. To collectivist…show more content…
Equality’s tunnel resembles Plato’s cave, and the Scholars represent those still not in reality. In fact, “The Council of Scholars has said that we all know the things which exist and therefore the things which are not known by all do not exist,” a mindset parallel to those unaware of reality (52). Equality travels to the Home of Scholars, attempting to bring them into the light, yet just as those in the Plato’s Allegory, the Scholars do not believe him. It is not until after Equality escapes into the forest, however, that he leaves the cave of morality: “We remembered we are the Damned. We remembered it and laughed” he jested (80). He now jokes about being ‘damned’ and now understands the reality portrayed by society was…show more content…
Discovery of such history had a profound impact on Equality such as when he read the word “I”. It is through man’s writing in which Equality came to understand “the blessed thing which (he) had called (his) curse” (98). This writing had such a positive impact on Equality that he decided to “write the first chapter of new history of man” so that it would be eternal (101). It is through his writing, that Prometheus will be remembered not as a number, but as a hero who vanquishes collectivism. His eternal message cautions the reader of the dangers of an irrational society so that someday man will think twice before chaining himself to the word

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