Meaning Of Culture Analysis

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It is necessary to understand the meaning of culture. Culture involves artistic and other activity of the mind, a state of high development in art and thought existing in a society and represented at various level in its members, the particular system of art, thought, and customs of a society; the arts, customs, beliefs, and all the other products of human thought made by people at a particular time,; development and improvement of the mind or body by education or training. 1'Cult' means a group of people believing in a particular system of religious worship, with its special customs and ceremonies, worship of or loyalty to a person, principle etc, the group of people following a popular fashion or a particular interest. 'Cultivable' is a thing …show more content…

For American Jewery, the Holocaust has penetrated so completely that one observer, Jocob Neusner (stranger at Home, 1981) has branded the American Jewish community as a "fillowship of victimhood". He and others fear that an intense memory of the Holocaust is crowding out a creative awareness of Judaism as a religions and a heritage. Whether or not these critics are right, there is no doubt that American Jews have always been preoccupied with the Holocaust, during one week each year, the organized American - Jewish community observes the "days of remembrance", in Hebrew, "Yom …show more content…

They reflect what Ruth B. Wisse termed Act II of American Jewish writing. The Holocaust novels and short stories of Arthur A. Cohen, Hugh Nissenson, Cynthia Ozick, Chaim Potok, Isaac Bashevis Singer, and Elie Wiesel are uncompromising in their adherence to covenantal Judaism. Singer, a refugee from Poland, wrote several novels directly treating American Jewery, and the Holocaust ("Enemies, A love story", 1972, Shosha, 1978; and The Penitent, 1982"). Two of Wiesel's searing novels (The Accident, 1962, and the fifth son, 1985)" concern this theme. Taking their cue from the Europeans, the native born Jewish - American novelists confront the disaster by utilizing mystical and rabbinic motifs, classical teachings and messianic hopes as normatic guides for the Jewish imagination. Issues of faith and doubt are a palpable presence in the lives of their characters. God, the covenant, and the Jewish people are enmeshed in the search for post Auschwitz meaning. The work of the late theologian and novelist Arthur A. Cohen is the model of religious response to the Holocaust. His Mammoth novel, "In the days of Simon Stern" (1973), combines magic, messianism, mysticism, and myth in outlining the continuing post-Holocaust struggle between good and evil very much in the Kabbalistic manner, Cohen underscores the tension between a diminished God and a mankind impatient to assume the role

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